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How a little Canadian web series about a lesbian vampire became a

first_imgNatasha Negovanlis, left, and Elise Bauman shoot a scene in Toronto for The Carmilla Movie. (Brenden Adam-Zwelling/Shaftesbury) Login/Register With: Advertisement Facebook Advertisement Twittercenter_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment The low-budget Canadian show began streaming five-minute episodes in 2014. It tells the story of a female university student who falls in love with a female vampire. There are now 108 five-minute episodes, which streams on KindaTV, a YouTube channel aimed at millennial viewers.‘Safe haven’Part of the reason the series took off, according to Negovanlis, lies in catering to the LGBTQ+ community.READ MORE Advertisement The 2017 Canadian Screen Awards shocked many in the television industry when the Fan Choice Award went to a little-known actor — Natasha Negovanlis — over popular television stars Hélène Joy and Yannick Bisson from Murdoch Mysteries.“Most of you are wondering who the heck I am,”  Negovanlis said as she accepted the award on stage.But millions in the digital realm would recognize the 27-year-old Toronto actor as Carmilla, a lesbian vampire. The YouTube series Carmilla has nearly 70 million views in its three-season run, fans in 193 countries, and has been translated into 20 languages. Now, it’s leaping to the big screen with a full-length feature film.last_img read more


October 15, 2019 0

CMF INVESTS MORE THAN 62M IN 27 CANADIAN INNOVATIVE DIGITAL MEDIA PRODUCTIONS

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Facebook Advertisement Login/Register With: Development support provides funding for the conceptualization of an eligible project or for the development of the creative and technical elements of an eligible project and the drafting of a product proposal for business development and financing purposes.Marketing supportThe CMF has contributed $2M in marketing support to eight interactive digital media projects, of which two are games, three rich interactive media applications and three software applications. Click here to access a list of projects and their description that received marketing support.Marketing support provides funding for the marketing and promotion of an eligible project such as the creation of national and international marketing campaigns, design costs, creation and market-testing of advertising, use of the Internet for promotion or transactions, and more.The CMF has contributed more than $77.5M in development and marketing support to 354 interactive digital media projects since the Experimental Stream was created in 2010.About the Canada Media FundThe Canada Media Fund (CMF) fosters, develops, finances and promotes the production of Canadian content and applications for all audiovisual media platforms. The CMF guides Canadian content towards a competitive global environment by fostering industry innovation, rewarding success, enabling a diversity of voice and promoting access to content through public and private sector partnerships. The CMF receives financial contributions from the Government of Canada and Canada’s cable, satellite and IPTV distributors. Please visit cmf-fmc.ca. Toronto – The Canada Media Fund (CMF) announced today an investment of more than $6.2M in development and marketing support to 27 innovative digital media projects as part of the 2017-2018 second round of funding of the Experimental Stream Innovation Program.Development supportA total of 19 Canadian companies received support totalling $4.2M to develop 12 games, five rich interactive media applications and two software applications. Click here to access a list of new projects that received development support. Twitter Advertisementlast_img read more


October 15, 2019 0

HEDLEY WERE ALLEGEDLY INVESTIGATED FOR DRUGGING UNDERAGE CONCERTGOER

first_img Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment This week, long-running Canadian pop band Hedley have been ousted from the Junos and lost a number of contracts over allegations of sexual misconduct with fans as young as 14. In a statement, the band chalked up their behaviour to “a lifestyle that incorporated certain rock and roll clichés.” However, rumours of their alleged misdeeds go all the way back to their early days. A story has now resurfaced regarding an alleged police investigation that involved an underage concertgoer being found outside a Hedley concert in London, ON, who had been drugged and possibly raped in 2005.Rob Bazinet worked at London’s beloved all-ages venue the Embassy for 11 years, serving as its general manager until the venue burned down in 2009. At the time, Bazinet was so synonymous with the venue that he earned the nickname Embassy Rob. (He has since taken the surname Houde through marriage and now works as a licensed security officer.)Speaking on the phone with Exclaim!, Bazinet recalled vivid details about an unnerving Hedley performance at the Embassy when the group were first starting out. The show — which took place on September 18, 2005 (as confirmed by a Web Archive capture of the band’s official website) — was part of the band’s first cross-Canada tour after Jacob Hoggard took third place on Canadian Idol. At the time, the lineup for Hedley included Hoggard alongside guitarist Dave Rosin, bassist Tommy Mac and drummer Chris Crippin.“All day, they were jerks to everybody,” Bazinet recalls. “The way they treated women and fans and even the bar staff was horrendous.” Advertisement Advertisement Facebook Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more


October 15, 2019 0

Students give their thoughts on Spence

first_imgAPTN National NewsWe went over to Dalhousie University in Halifax Thursday.We asked some students about what they though of Chief Theresa Spence ending her fast.Here’s what they told APTN National News reporter Ossie Michelin.last_img


October 14, 2019 0

Rinelle Harper ready to repeat call for inquiry at roundtable in Ottawa

first_imgAPTN National NewsOTTAWA – Rinelle Harper, the 16 year-old girl who survived a brutal attack in Winnipeg to become the embodiment of the violence faced by Indigenous women, plans to call for a national inquiry if she speaks during the national roundtable in Ottawa Friday.Harper, who is sitting next to Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde at the main table, said during the lunch break she hadn’t spoken yet during the meeting and was unsure if she would.Harper, however, came prepared with handwritten notes she’d use if the moment came and she decided to speak to the roundtable delegates, who range from premiers to federal cabinet ministers to the families of murdered and missing Indigenous women.Harper allowed APTN National News to view a part of her notes. She had them tightly folded in her pant pocket.“For me, the inquiry would help women to come forward and report the assaults that happened to them,” said a portion of Harper’s notes. “The inquiry would be a chance for women and their families to heal from the past.”Harper was found along the Assiniboine River in Winnipeg by a passerby on the morning of Nov. 8, 2014. She had been left for dead. Winnipeg police said Harper was attacked twice, the second time after she crawled out of the river.Police charged a 20 year-old male and a 17 year-old male in connection with the attack. Both the accused were First Nation males.Not all family members of the missing and murdered are in favour of an inquiry.Elisapee Sheutiapik, from Iqaluit, said the money that would be spent on an inquiry would be better used by services.“With the money you are going to spend on an inquiry get us mental health workers, get us housing,” she said. “We don’t need an inquiry.”Sheutiapik’s teenage sister Mary Ann Birmingham was found stabbed to death in Iqaluit 29 years ago. The murder is still unsolved.A man from Iqaluit named Jopie Atsiqtaq was initially charged with the murder, but a judge determined during a preliminary hearing there was not enough evidence to proceed to full trail.Atsiqtaq was later convicted for the 1986 murder of a man and his mother.news@aptn.ca@APTNNewslast_img read more


October 14, 2019 0

Victim tells court she relived fear of Brazeaus alleged attack listening to

first_imgJorge BarreraAPTN National NewsThe sound of a weeping woman’s voice filled the Gatineau, Que., courtroom Tuesday, on the second day of suspended Senator Patrick Brazeau’s trial on assault and sexual assault charges.The Crown played two recordings of 911 calls made shortly after 9 a.m. on Feb. 7, 2013, from the rented Gatineau house where Brazeau lived with a woman.The second day of the trial began with a continuation of the victim’s testimony of the alleged break-up attack she endured at the hands of Brazeau, who was still a Conservative Senator at the time.Brazeau has pleaded not guilty to the charges.The 911 recordings were of a woman’s voice who, through sobs, said her partner had assaulted her and she needed police help.“My (partner) hit me,” said the woman.-snip-“Is he in the house?” said the male police officer who answered the second 911 call.“Yes,” said the woman, between sobs.“What’s his name,” said the officer.“Patrick Brazeau,” said the woman.As the audio played, the victim began to cry quietly as she stood facing the judge, Brazeau and his lawyers to her right, the Crown prosecutors to her left.The victim testified before the Crown played the 911 recordings that she went to the kitchen to call police after Brazeau sexually assaulted her with his finger a second time while she was on her hands and knees on the stairs. She said Brazeau had his arm around her neck and used his fingers to penetrate her buttocks area. The victim said the land-line telephone in the kitchen was disconnected and then she went to the bathroom to call the police with her cell phone. She didn’t know who disconnected the land-line.The first call from 911 at 9:04 a.m. was cut short. The 911 operator asked , “what is your emergency?”The woman on the other end said, “Is this the police?”Then the line went dead. The 911 operator called back and it rang about 8 times with no answer.The victim testified she didn’t remember making the first phone call.She called 911 back at 9:06 a.m. and her called was answered by the male police officer.The Crown asked the victim what she felt while listing to the 911 call.“It made me relive what I was feeling that day, the fear,” she said.The Crown submitted photographs taken of the victim’s injuries shortly after police arrived at the home. Judge Valmont Beaulieu ruled that the photos of injuries to the woman’s buttocks area could not be published by the media.The jeans the victim wore that day were also submitted as evidence and the victim held them in her hands. The button to fasten the jeans was missing and the zipper was broken, she said.A button was found on the floor by police. The victim has testified Brazeau forcibly yanked down her pants to sexually assault her.The victim also testified how she found her ripped purple turtleneck hidden beneath Brazeau’s dresser in the bedroom after she returned to the house with two officers to retrieve some of her belongings later that fateful Thursday.The victim testified Monday she was holding the sweater in her hands when Brazeau allegedly attacked her. She said Brazeau ripped the sweater. The sweater was entered as evidence Monday along with a ripped piece of cloth. She said the sweater was left on the stairs after the attack.The victim also told the court she deleted intimate videos of her and Brazeau from a video camera when she returned to the bedroom with police at the time she found the sweater hidden.Tuesday began with the Crown asking her to draw, roughly, the places in the house where she said Brazeau attacked her. With black and pink markers she was asked to mark the places where he sexually assaulted her. She was also asked to draw a stick-man Brazeau to show where he was during the first sexual assault. The Crown also asked the victim to mark with a pink x the place where Brazeau slammed her head against a wall.The Crown also asked the victim about pictures Brazeau took down from the wall following the alleged attack. The victim said she saw Brazeau take down some of the pictures after she called police. She said she didn’t see him take down the photograph of her, Brazeau and Prime Minister Stephen Harper. She also said she didn’t know who ripped the photograph, which has the stamp of the Prime Minister’s Office at the bottom.Police photo of broken railingThe trial continues Tuesday afternoon with more from the victim along with testimony from the two police officers who were first at the home following the 911 call.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more


October 14, 2019 0

Fort McKay Metis and preparing for life after the tar sands

first_img“Everyone is tapping on their brakes and people are taking a step back in terms of how aggressive they want to be in their developments. It’s a sobering second look- it gives the community the chance to catch our breath. If oil was to turn the key off tomorrow and go home this community would take at least 20 years to go back to the lifestyle that it had prior because everything around our community, in terms of our traditional territory, is gone.”Quintal said he’s terrified by what he’s witnessed over the years with the land being eaten up and polluted by industry.“The fact is we are putting controls in place. We have three air monitoring systems in the community at all times. Everything is under scrutiny. Do I think it’s all industry’s fault? There’s a good case against that.”But, it’s not just environmental impacts that came with the economic boom train, social issues add additional challenges.“Many here are living with addictions. Because the money is everywhere. We have 18 year old kids, graduating high school with opportunity. They go to work and drive heavy haulers and suddenly make $100,000 a year.”Quintal acknowledges that time is running out. They have money now, but the land is being destroyed and they may not have a place to call home in the near future.They are already planning ahead however, given the circumstances, to create a new vision for the coming generations.Recognizing the dilemma the Fort McKay Metis is buying land in Isle La Crosse Saskatchewan- an area with a high density of Metis people. It will be a place for the people to go to if Fort McKay ends up being swallowed up by industry.“We don’t have any sanctuaries to go to, but we’re buying lots to build some cabins and a lodge to be able to take our people away if they want to. There they can fish, hunt, pick berries and go back to nature,” said Quintal.Regardless of the challenges before them, the people will continue to take advantage of economic opportunities while they still can, said Quintal.Homes under construction in the Fort McKay Metis community. Photo: Brandi Morin/APTN“What we need in Alberta is a policy that will enable the Metis the ability to be more engaged…That’s not to say we want to stop industry. We want to use the best technology possible, to know where you’re (industry) going to be working within our traditional territory. And we want the opportunity to continue make money off of the projects.”bmorin@aptn.ca@songstress28 (The administrative offices in the Fort McKay Metis community that has 90 members and 800 hectares of land in Alberta. Photo: Brandi Morin/APTN)Brandi Morin APTN National NewsFORT MCKAY METIS COMMUNITY — New houses and new trucks greet you upon arrival at the Fort McKay Metis community in northern Alberta. It is a small place, a mere dot on the map, located north of Fort McMurray, between the tar sands and next to Fort McKay First Nation.The Fort McKay Metis is a unique community that was established during the fur trade here in the 1900’s.The people here have close ties with the local First Nation as well as mixed ancestry including French, English, Cree, Dene and Metis.Encompassing 800 hectares of land and having just under 90 members. it is the only Metis community that was able to negotiate their lands away from the Alberta government.It is surrounded by industrial development, mainly tar sands activity. The tar sands have had a large impact on the local environment and traditional territories of the Metis.Most say that for a time, they were ignored when it came to consultation with industry.The Metis here, like their First Nation neighbours, at one time tried to stop industry from encroaching on their territories with little success.Fort McKay Metis President Ron Quintal. Photo:Brandi Morin/APTN“It felt like everything was rubber stamped. Like our concerns were an afterthought,” said President Ron Quintal.That is until Fort McKay Chief Jim Boucher stepped up and insisted industry also consult with the Metis, he said.“In Alberta there is no policy or legislation in place that a proponent has to talk to a Metis organization while they talk to the First Nations about the exact same impacts. But we have been able to negotiate deals with industry,” said Quintal.They are prospering alongside Fort McKay First Nation. The community doesn’t receive any government money and is completely self-reliant via business agreements with industry.Through profits earned from the Fort McKay Metis Group LTD., several initiatives are funded like a beautification program, park building, housing, post-secondary scholarships and local infrastructure.“I’m about the success of my community and doing the best I can to ensure my community is successful,” said Quintal, which he added, includes mitigating environmental concerns.“We work with industry. We’ve gone this far and we use our best judgement to ensure industry and government are working sustainably.”Now, Quintal is asking for the ability to hit the brakes on further development. The current down turn in oil prices is an opportunity to look at ways to diversify the economy.last_img read more


October 14, 2019 0

AFN executive proposes to suspend Morley Googoo as member over harassment allegations

first_imgAFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde addressing media at the AGA in Fredericton. Photo: Justin Brake/APTNAPTN NewsThe Assembly of First Nations (AFN) executive board is proposing a suspension for Morley Googoo, regional chair for the AFN of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, over harassment allegations levelled against him in a report written last year.“It is the view of the AFN Executive Committee, acting in the capacity as the NIB (National Indian Brotherhood) board, that your alleged harassment and direct discrimination against women in your region is potentially detrimental to our organization,” said a letter from the AFN to Googoo dated Monday.Googoo now has 20 days to respond.In the report written in September 2018, Cheryl Maloney, former president of the Nova Scotia Native Women’s Association, said she was harassed by Googoo.The lawyer conducting the investigation said he reviewed emails, texts, conducted interviews, and reviewed social media posts and found that Googoo had acted aggressive towards some women and bullied others.Googoo denied the reports findings and said the report was “not to true to me.”At the AFN Annual General Assembly in Fredericton Tuesday Bellegarde told reporters the AFN “has a zero tolerance policy for any form of harassment, any kind of bullying, any kind of discrimination, so we take things very seriously. And as leaders we’re held to a higher standard.”St. Mary’s First Nation Chief Alan Polchies, who is facing charges of assault and sexual assault, was scheduled to speak at the AFN event Tuesday morning, but Bellegarde said the AFN and Wolastoqey leadership reached an agreement that Polchies would not address the delegation from the stage, but instead from a microphone.Polchies delivered his welcoming message to chiefs and delegates from the floor, but did not address the charges against him.“An allegation has been made against me by a member of our community which I would normally take to court to prove my innocence due to my belief of the lack of evidence required to obtain a conviction,” Polchies said in the statement.But he said he has been offered and accepted a post charge diversion by the Crown prosecutor’s office, which could result in dropped charges if offenders undertake intervention efforts.Bellegarde said the decisions taken on Googoo and Polchies were done with the intention of creating a “respectful, safe place” within the AFN.Asked by APTN News what AFN is doing about the broader issue of First Nations male leadership abusing their positions of power and disrespecting women, Bellgarde said “it’s a very serious issue, no question.”In recent weeks allegations of harassment have come to light against Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs Grand Chief Arlen Dumas, Googoo, and most recently the assault charges against Polchies.The national chief said the AFN “will not tolerate any bullying, we will not tolerate any harassment, we will not tolerate any discrimination.”He said now that a decision in Googoo’s case has been made, “we’ve got to move forward — there’s a host of other issues we’ve got to focus on.”Googoo is currently in Lima, Peru with students at a cultural exchange and did not respond to APTN’s request for comment.With files from Justin Brake and Amber Bernardlast_img read more


October 14, 2019 0

Ontario reforms labour laws boosts minimum wage to 15 in 2019

first_imgTORONTO – Ontario passed sweeping labour reform legislation Wednesday, including increasing the minimum wage to $15 an hour, which will form a key pillar of the governing Liberals’ re-election bid next year.Premier Kathleen Wynne has been tying the policy at nearly every opportunity to a theme of fairness that will likely carry through to the June 2018 election, along with free tuition for low- and middle-income students, more child care spaces and pharmacare for youth.The minimum wage boost has proved largely popular in government polling and with labour advocates, though it is controversial with businesses, who say the increase is too fast and will lead to job losses.Currently at $11.60 an hour, the minimum wage will rise under the legislation to $14 an hour on Jan. 1, with the increase to $15 coming in 2019. It will then continue to rise with inflation.The government and some economists argue that the hike will have some positive impact on the economy, as minimum wage earners get more spending power.“Actually what you see is increases in employment because that money gets recycled,” said Labour Minister Kevin Flynn.“This isn’t money that goes to the Cayman Islands. This isn’t money that goes into savings accounts. If you’re trying to raise a family on a minimum wage in the province of Ontario you don’t have a savings account,” he said. “What you do is you take that money out, you pay your rent, you pay your groceries, maybe a little car payment, you buy some shoes for the kids, diapers, that goes right back into the businesses.”Flynn also immediately made political hay of the Progressive Conservatives voting against the legislation.“I really think it was a slap in the face to working people in the province,” he said. “I expected better.”Progressive Conservative John Yakabuski said his party didn’t support it because of various analyses and business groups warning such a sharp increase in minimum wage will lead to job losses.“The accelerated increase in the minimum wage is the No. 1 reason why we had to send a clear message that we’re going to defend what we believe are the working class in Ontario,” he said. “If you haven’t got a job your wage is zero.”The province’s economic watchdog, the Financial Accountability Office, has estimated more than 50,000 people could lose their jobs due to the minimum wage increase.A TD Bank report has estimated the minimum wage hike could cost the province’s economy as many as 90,000 jobs by 2020. And an analysis from the Keep Ontario Working Coalition concluded over 185,000 jobs could be impacted.Businesses say it will be difficult to absorb the increased costs over such a short time frame.“They also turned a blind eye to numerous surveys and evidence-backed studies warning of significant job losses, especially among lower-skilled workers,” said Julie Kwiecinski, with the Canadian Federation of Independent Business.The Liberal government recently announced the provincial corporate tax rate for small businesses will be cut from 4.5 per cent to 3.5 per cent to help support businesses through the minimum wage transition, though Wynne said it was never intended to fully offset the impact.The legislation also mandates equal pay for part-time and temporary workers doing the same job as full-time employees, increases vacation entitlements to three weeks after a worker has been with their company for five years, requires employees to be paid for three hours if their shift is cancelled within 48 hours of its start, and expands personal emergency leave to 10 days per year, two of them paid.The minimum wage increase is the centrepiece of the legislation and something labour advocates have been urging for years.“The $15 minimum wage will put money where it is deserved and most needed, into workers’ pockets,” Navi Aujla, a former temp agency worker with the $15 & Fairness campaign, said in a statement.“Together with paid emergency days, fairer scheduling and equal pay for equal work measures, $15 will make a real difference for our communities who fought so hard for this victory.”The Ontario Federation cheered the passage of the legislation but had hoped it would contain even more changes.“The law needs to go further to better safeguard decent work for generations to come,” said president Chris Buckley. “It must reflect what these workers and so many others face every day, including low wages, no access to unions and no job security.”The NDP had proposed amendments to give all workers five paid sick days, eliminate minimum wage exemptions for servers and limit how much companies can rely on temp workers, but the Liberals voted them down.“Workers have been waiting 14 long years actually under the Liberal government for some improvements to their working conditions in this province,” said New Democrat Cindy Forster.last_img read more


October 13, 2019 0

US stocks stage late rally as TSX dips in red after tumultuous

first_imgTORONTO – North American markets largely pushed higher Friday after a choppy session, capping off a tumultuous period that has seen Canada’s main stock index drop more than five per cent since last week and eight per cent from its all-time high.In Toronto, the S&P/TSX composite index was down 31.08 points or 0.21 per cent to 15,034.53, after losing nearly 280 points and gaining more than 45 points throughout the day.On the commodity-heavy TSX, defensive buys into the health-care and utilities sectors helped offset losses in the influential energy and materials sectors.In New York, stocks staged a late rally, with the Dow Jones industrial average finishing the session up 330.44 points or 1.38 per cent to 24,190.90 — after briefly sinking as low as 500 points.Meanwhile, the S&P 500 index was up 38.55 points or 1.49 per cent to 2,619.55, and the Nasdaq composite index was up 97.33 points or 1.44 per cent to 6,874.49.Both the Dow and S&P 500 lost more than five per cent for the week, as the Dow recorded 1,000-point drops on Monday and Thursday.The late rally across U.S. equity markets Friday could bode well for the next opening of markets on Monday.How stocks trade in the 30 minutes leading up to the close of markets — often called the most important half hour of the day — “typically sets the tone for the next trading session,” said Ian Scott, an equity analyst at Manulife Asset Management.Still, the defensiveness that stock markets have seen this week likely means that investors aren’t ready to fully embrace buying into the unusually large dips seen recently, as they have in the past. “It may keep drifting for a while,” Scott said.Financial analysts regard corrections as normal events but say the abrupt stock market rout that began last Friday might have been triggered by a combination of events that rattled investors. Those include worries about a potential rise in U.S. inflation or interest rates and budget disputes in Washington.Statistics Canada’s weaker-than-expected jobs report released Friday, in which jobs fell by 88,000 in January to give the labour market its steepest one-month drop in nine years, is also likely adding additional downward pressure on the TSX.“There’s going to be questions about whether that’s tied in the minimum wage increases we’ve had in Ontario,” Scott said. “The Canadian index is probably likely to take longer to rebound than the U.S. indices will, just given that the risk that NAFTA is going to be abolished seems to be increasing with time rather than decreasing.”In currency markets, the Canadian dollar closed at an average trading value of 79.31 cents US, down 0.15 of a U.S. cent — continuing a sharp drop that has seen the loonie rocked by global equity volatility.The Canadian dollar tends to move on several types of data — particularly commodity prices, which also saw their fortunes reversed this week by the heightened levels of volatility in the market place.When oil prices fall, the loonie typically follows suit, especially against the greenback as oil prices are denominated in U.S. dollars. The March crude contract was down US$1.95 to US$59.20 per barrel on Friday.Elsewhere in commodities, the March natural gas contract was down 11 cents to US$2.58 per mmBTU. The April gold contract was down US$3.30 to US$1,315.70 an ounce and the March copper contract was down five cents to US$3.03 a pound.last_img read more


October 13, 2019 0

Some PEI business immigrants out of country over 100 days a year

first_imgClose to one in five immigrants who committed to run a business “within” Prince Edward Island for a year spent 100 or more days abroad, according to government documents for the last fiscal year.Despite the days away, they were not disqualified from the program and have been granted permanent residency with the freedom to move anywhere in Canada.The figures provided to The Canadian Press through freedom-of-information laws show the self-reported travels of 88 immigrants in P.E.I’s Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) who signed deals saying they’d run a firm for 12 months.The absence rates demonstrate the Island needs to move to match the higher standards of other provinces, a veteran observer of Canada’s immigration programs says.“Prince Edward Island just has to up its game here,” said Richard Kurland, a Vancouver-based immigration lawyer and policy analyst, in a telephone interview.The Island program requires immigrants to “provide active and ongoing management of the business from within Prince Edward Island,” but the contracts also say the newcomers are only required to show they spend half the year in Canada.One person deemed to be a successful participant in the Island’s program was gone 182 days, a day short of the maximum allowed.Another 15 were on the road over 100 days, while about 43 per cent — or 39 people — were out of Canada for 50 days or more as their business continued.The province’s Office of Immigration says the standards are being looked at, but there’s no firm plan for changes at this point.“Would we ever look at increasing the days requirements in our program? That is one thing we’re currently looking at, to ensure it’s properly aligned with the outcomes we’re looking for … as well as ensuring they’re properly aligned with our sister provinces,” Jamie Aiken, the director of the Office of Immigration, said in an interview.Aiken said some people in the program are involved in tourism enterprises that may require them to travel internationally for lengthy periods to drum up business, while some businesses may be seasonal in nature.However, Kurland says the time immigrants can spend abroad follows a pattern of P.E.I.’s standards being notably easier to meet than most other provinces, particularly those of British Columbia and Ontario.“You have looser standards, there’s little enforcement and the person (immigrant) isn’t as legally obligated as in Ontario … to do more,” he said in a recent telephone interview.Under the program, applicants provide the Island government with a $200,000 deposit, and commit to invest $150,000 and manage a firm that incurs at least $75,000 in operating costs.After the deal is signed, the province nominates the investor to the federal Immigration Department as a permanent resident.After a year, the immigrants can claim a refund of $150,000 if they met the business requirements, and $50,000 more if they could prove to the province they stayed in the province for the minimum time period.The province has already acknowledged that two thirds of the PNP businesses in 2016-17, a total of 177 people, didn’t receive a refund for the business portion of their deposit, with the majority simply never opening a business. The province has said most nonetheless have remained in Canada, though there were no figures available for how many days this group is spending in the country.Island Investment Development Inc., a Crown corporation which holds the deposits for the newcomers’ businesses, indicates $18 million in net revenues as a result of forfeited deposits in 2016-17 — equivalent to about half the province’s projected new spending on infrastructure projects.In most other provinces, the business immigration systems don’t work that way.In Ontario and British Columbia, for example, the entrepreneurs are granted temporary work permits and the province only sends in the immigrants’ applications for permanent residency to Ottawa after the immigrants are deemed to have successfully carried out their end of the deal.In addition, in Ontario the immigrant entrepreneur must spend at least nine months of the year in the province while they’re in the program — or 274 days.In Nova Scotia, a clause in the entrepreneur category specifically states that “the business must be actively managed by the applicant from the place of business in Nova Scotia. The business must not be managed from another location in Nova Scotia or from another Canadian province or territory or other country.”A spokeswoman for the Nova Scotia department said work permits can be cancelled if random site checks showed participants aren’t in the province.Kurland says Prince Edward Island has immigrant communities forming, and with some evidence newcomers are choosing to settle in the province there’s little justification for P.E.I.’s standards to fall below those of other jurisdictions.“If P.E.I. brought its standards up to the levels of other provinces, there’d still be no shortage of takers for P.E.I. business immigration programs … I don’t understand why P.E.I. is unwilling to raise the bar,” he said.The current system on the Island has also been criticized for allowing applications for permanent residency when a business immigrant arrives, rather than requiring terms and conditions of the program first be met.Aiken said no changes are planned in that area.“Coming over and starting a business is a significant undertaking. To have the comfort that your permanent residence status has been granted at the time of landing does present some attractiveness to an individual,” he said.Follow (at)mtuttoncporg on Twitter.last_img read more


October 13, 2019 0

Victoria lands top spot on Christies luxury housing markets list

first_imgVICTORIA – Victoria, B.C. has landed the top spot on Christie’s global list of hottest luxury housing markets.The real estate arm of the famed auction company says strong year-over-year sales growth and high domestic demand for housing catapulted the Vancouver Island community to lead a list of cities around the world on the annual list.Trailing Victoria on last year’s list are San Diego and Orange County, Calif., followed by Washington D.C. and Paris.Christie’s says the Victoria market earned such a high ranking because it is seeing an influx of buyers from the United States and China and sales rates that rival frenzied and neighbouring markets Toronto and Vancouver.It says the average time it took to sell a luxury property in Victoria last year was only 32 days, down from 41 days in 2016, making it one of the most fast-paced markets in the world.Christie’s also listed Toronto in the ninth spot on its list of most luxurious global cities for prime property and Muskoka, Ont. in the second position for its rankings of the hottest secondary home markets.last_img read more


October 13, 2019 0

Zimmer questions Cambridge Analytica whistleblower Christopher Wylie in standing committee

first_imgMr. Zimmer: “Have you watched the testimony of Mr. Zack Massingham and Mr. Jeff Silvester as they appeared before our committee in Canada?”Mr. Wylie: “I have watched parts of it. I haven’t seen the entire thing.”Mr. Zimmer: “Is it your opinion that they were untruthful to our committee in watching that testimony?”Mr. Wylie: “My impression was that there were answers that felt obfuscated or, as has been discussed now, so fantastical that it is hard to believe.”“I am aware of projects where clients from one country would be interested in …the electoral results in another,” said Wylie when asked about foreign interests using personal data for political purposes. “My understanding is that SCL did participate where some of the funders would not be nationals or residents of the country that they were operating in.”When asked about the use of personal data for voter suppression, Wylie clarified that he was that he was referring to “targeting particular groups of people with messages that will disengage them or frustrate them or confuse them which ultimately will in some cases inhibit or demotivate them enough not to participate in an election.”Following the meeting, Zimmer said that his main concern is over how personal data can be used to manipulate the democratic process both in Canada and in other countries.“We accept that companies will use personal information to advertise to us. It is a completely different and more troubling concern that our information is being used to manipulate us and our democracy and we need to examine how we can prevent it from happening in Canada.” OTTAWA, O.N. — Prince George-Peace River-Northern Rockies MP Bob Zimmer, who is Chair of the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics, questioned former Cambridge Analytica employee Christopher Wylie after he testified to the committee today.Wylie is the man who blew the whistle on Cambridge Analytica’s alleged improper gathering of millions of Facebook users’ personal data. Wylie testified today as part of the committee’s study of the breach of personal information involving Cambridge Analytica and Facebook.Along with answering questions surrounding AggregateIQ executives Zack Massingham and Jeff Silvester, Wylie testified regarding how the improper use of personal data can threaten democracy. The following is an except from today’s Q&A session:last_img read more


October 13, 2019 0

Local MLAs voice concerns over new legislation for the ALR

first_imgVICTORIA, B.C. – Following the Government’s announcement to introduce legislation that they say will strengthen the independence of the Agricultural Land Commission, local MLAs Mike Bernier and Dan Davies went to Facebook to voice their concerns.In the video, both MLAs find the new Bill 15 disturbing and upsetting, with Bernier saying this Bill will change the way how farmers and landowners will be treated.“What’s really upsetting with Bill 15, is basically how farmers and landowners are going to be treated.” Davies claims the Bill to be a blatant infringement on the rights of landowners.“It’s a blatant infringement on people’s right of land ownership, it certainly is the Agricultural Land Commission, and I think that is the fundamental issue that I am taking up with this Bill.”Bernier says, within the Bill, the Government is removing the requirement for owner consent for any changes made to the ALR.“They’re removing the requirement for owner consent for any changes to the ALR. So, you, as a landowner won’t have a say, and under the Act, you as a landowner are no longer allowed to even apply to the Agricultural Land Commission if this Bill passes.”Both Bernier and Davies are vowing to challenge the Government on this Bill in order to protect the rights of their constituents.last_img read more


October 13, 2019 0

Local MLAs voice concerns over draft caribou recovery agreements

first_imgPeace River North MLA, Dan Davies, echos the concerns that Bernier has on the issue saying that the Government is not providing enough time for public consultation on the draft and that stakeholders should have been included in the process.“It’s way too late. We’ve been asking for over a year now to be included in the consultation. We’ve been asking on behalf of stakeholders to be included in the consultations and now they have come out with a draft plan. Unfortunately, it’s a draft plan and all stakeholders should have a had a play in how that looked and how that’s rolled out.”Both Bernier and Davies feel that the Government will go ahead with the draft agreement and then consult with stakeholders after the fact.Bernier hopes that the Government will remove the short timeline they have given for consultation as stakeholders will need more time to provide comment and feedback on the draft agreement before they can accept it.“The Government needs to back away from this pressure that they have given to everybody in the Region, that they only have, basically, until the end of April to digest this and actually comment. Stakeholders and groups are going to need more time than that.”According to the Government, this draft is to offer temporary protection to the central caribou population in British Columbia while a long-term plan is developed. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – With B.C., Ottawa, the West Moberly and Saulteau First Nations reaching a recent draft agreement on caribou recovery, local MLAs are voicing their concerns.MLA for Peace River South, Mike Bernier, says he is concerned that the Government took a long time to release a draft and will not provide a long enough time frame for public consultation on the agreement.“The main issue and concern is that it has taken a long time for Government to actually release this draft. It’s taken a long time and now they’re only giving four or five weeks for the public, the local government, and stakeholders to comment.”last_img read more


October 13, 2019 0

BC Hydro says crews are out trying to restore service

first_img“We suspect it is the wind that is causing the outage in connection with trees,” said Gammer.When its too windy branches connect with powerlines and even trees may have fallen oven or are resting on lines, suspects Gammer.To stay up to date with the progress of restoration Gammer directs customers to visit the BC Hydro website under ‘Power Outage’ then continue to either the ‘View List’ by clicking; HERE. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – With large sections of the city and surrounding areas without power BC Hydro shares, they are working to restore power.Bob Gammer, Community Relations for BC Hydro, says there is no estimated time of restoration of service at this time, yet crews are on the scene starting to do their work, have been assigned or are on route.BC Hydro crews are looking for all signs of trouble, likely trees on lines and looking for those types of faults they need to clear off before they can restore power, shared Gammer.last_img read more


October 12, 2019 0

Woman killed as two cars collide on Yamuna Expressway

first_imgNEW DELHI: A woman died and eight persons were injured when two cars collided on the Yamuna Expressway on Saturday, police said.The incident occurred at around 9.30 am when one of the cars collided with the other while overtaking it, they said. All the injured were admitted to Nayati hospital on the Agra-Mathura highway, police said. While the woman was declared brought dead by the doctors, four others were stated to be critical. The deceased has been identified as Munni Devi( 50 years ), she was a resident of Ferozabad in UP. The injured according to sources are from Tundla in UP. The injured have been rushed to the hospital by police where they are undergoing treatment.last_img read more


October 12, 2019 0

Court reserves order in defamation case against Tharoor

first_imgNew Delhi: A Delhi court on Monday reserved its order on issuing summons to Congress Lok Sabha member Shashi Tharoor in a defamation complaint filed by the Bhartiya Janata Party (BJP) leader Rajeev Babbar. Additional Chief Metropolitan Magistrate Samar Vishal said that he will deliver the order, on whether to summon Tharoor or not, on April 22. The court was hearing a criminal defamation complaint against Tharoor for his comment that Prime Minister Narendra Modi is “a scorpion seated on a Shiv-ling”. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’ Babbar has filed the complaint alleging that Tharoor made the statement with mala fide intention, which not only denigrates the Hindu deity but is also defamatory. Babbar requested the court to initiate proceeding against Tharoor under Section 499/500 (defamation) of the Indian Penal Code. Speaking at the Bangalore Literature Festival on October 28, 2018, Tharoor had said: “Modi is like a scorpion sitting on a Shiv-ling. You cannot remove him with your hand and you cannot hit it with a ‘chappal’ (slipper) either.” Babbar said he was hurt by the comment as it is not only baseless, but also misleading and defamatory. He also told the court that he considers Modi an inspiration, and has the highest regards for the Prime Minister.last_img read more


October 12, 2019 0

Equity indices open in red

first_imgMumbai: The key Indian equity indices opened on a negative note on Monday. At 9.33 a.m, the Nifty50 on the National Stock Exchange traded at 11,256.55, lower by 22.35 points or 0.20 per cent from the previous close of 11,278.90 points. The BSE Sensex traded at 37,454.25, lower by 8.74 or 0.02 per cent, from the previous close of 37,462.99 points. It opened at 37,491.30 and has so far touched an intra-day high of 37,505.66 and a low of 37,319 points.last_img


October 12, 2019 0