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Convention pledges continued advocacy for peace in Sudan

first_img By Lynette WilsonPosted Jul 9, 2012 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Sudan & South Sudan TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab General Convention, General Convention 2012, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Convention pledges continued advocacy for peace in Sudan A group of Sudanese men from Chicago attended Indianapolis Day festivities in Victory Field during a General Convention event hosted by the Diocese of Indianapolis July 8. Photo/Araceli Ma[Episcopal News Service — Indianapolis] On the first anniversary of the formation of the Republic of South Sudan, the Episcopal Church, meeting here in its 77th General Convention, re-affirmed advocacy support for peace in Sudan through the passage of Resolution A019.“When Sudan divided into two countries, it created lots of challenges,” said Rev. John Augustino Lumori, acting provincial secretary of the Episcopal Church of Sudan and an international guest of convention, adding that continued support is important so that the church can continue to prosper.The Episcopal Church’s long-standing support for Sudan is manifested through its partnerships and companion diocese relationships, programs supported by Episcopal Relief & Development, and advocacy work of the Washington, D.C.-based Office of Government Relations, which is rooted in General Convention resolutions.The Episcopal Church of Sudan, home to 2 million Episcopalians, has 31 dioceses — 26 of them in South Sudan where it is one of the nation’s largest non-government organizations and has played a role in reconciliation in the aftermath of a two-decades-long civil war fought largely between the Arab and Muslim north and rebels in the Christian-animist south.In 2005, the warring parties — the north’s Khartoum-based Government of Sudan and the south’s Sudan People’s Liberation Movement — signed a Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA), ending the civil war that killed more than 2 million people and displaced an estimated 7 million more.In January 2011, as specified in the CPA, a plebiscite was held allowing residents of what was then southern Sudan to decide whether to stay a unified country or become an independent nation. Six months later on July 9, 2011, the Republic of South Sudan was born.“The church is still one, we have not been split,” said John Bior, development officer in the Diocese of Bor in the eastern South Sudan state of Jonglei, where post-independence, inner-ethnic violence has killed some 900 people from the end of 2011 into February of this year.(The United Nations Mission in South Sudan has faulted the South Sudanese Government for not being able to protect civilians in Jonglei state.)Humanitarian crisisThe government of South Sudan is basically broke, because it hasn’t received any oil revenue and the fledgling country is almost without infrastructure, said Bior, who is attending General Convention along with others from the Diocese of Bor as guests of its companion, the Diocese of Indianapolis.Among other things, the CPA called for equal oil revenue sharing between north and south; fair demarcation of north-south boundaries; and resolution citizenship issues, all of which remain unresolved. Christians living in the north have faced continued violence and persecution.“There was war and we just came out,” said Atong Chaw in the Sudanese dialect Dinka, as interpreted by Bior. “There is a lot of poverty, and when there is poverty there is nothing. There are a lot of needs and wants.“Women and children are suffering,” she said, adding that many men died fighting the war. “[Women] are left to take care of everything.”As secretary of the Mothers’ Union in the Diocese of Bor, Chaw is working to establish a women’s center to provided education and training and childcare.Women, both Chaw and Bior said, need to be educated about HIV/AIDS and negative cultural practices. For instance, they said if a woman’s husband dies his brother inherits the wife. If the husband died of HIV/AIDS and the wife is also a carrier, the brother, and subsequently his other wives, may also become infected.Bor Town, the county seat of Bor and where the diocese is located, the town and the church are struggling with the large number of rural South Sudanese, who escaping the violence, have fled to the city.“Ninety to 95 percent of the population in Bor County is Christian,” said Bior, adding the first thing the villagers do upon arriving in Bor is find the church.During a July 4 open hearing of the National and International Concerns Committee held at the Downtown Marriott, Richard Parkins, the executive editor of the American Friends of the Episcopal Church in Sudan testified that AFRECS described the situation as an “unparalleled humanitarian disaster,” and recognized the role the Episcopal Church of Sudan has played in reconciliation, and the importance of the U.S.-based Episcopal Church’s continued support for the church in Sudan.Awareness and advocacyThe Episcopal Public Policy Network in May issued an action alert asking its members to contact their congress members in support of the Sudan Peace, Security and Accountability Act of 2012, which calls for the “development of a comprehensive strategy to end serious human rights violations in Sudan,” and also for an investment in agriculture.Meghan Johnson, a visitor from the Diocese of Minnesota and an Episcopal Peace Fellowship young adult representative, gave impassioned, tearful testimony during the July 4 hearing imploring the Episcopal Church to continue its support for peace in Sudan.“If we want to live up to our Baptismal Covenant,” she said. “This has to be something that we advocate for.”Johnson also expressed frustration at the American public’s limited awareness of the humanitarian crisis that continues in Sudan, a crisis dating back to the 2003 war in Darfur, where hundreds of thousands of people were killed and more than 2 million displaced.In 2005, as a freshman in high school in De Pere, Wisconsin, Johnson often wore a “Save Darfur” T-shirt and started an awareness campaign aimed at educating her classmates, she said in a July 5 interview with Episcopal News Service.She couldn’t remember, she said, exactly how Darfur got on her radar, but once it did, she became impassioned.At the very least, she said, the Episcopal Church should support international efforts promoting peace in Sudan.“I don’t want our support to be a prayer,” Johnson said. “That’s not enough.”— Lynette Wilson is a reporter/editor for Episcopal News Service. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel center_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL Africa, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Tags Submit a Job Listing Advocacy Peace & Justice, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PAlast_img read more


June 20, 2021 0

Pittsburgh ordains new bishop with pomp and a parable

first_img Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC House of Bishops, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (1) October 23, 2012 at 11:54 am Good for you, Bishop McConnell. May “Morgan the bridge builder” continue to share in your journey in the episcopate. Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC People This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY center_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Washington, DC Comments are closed. Morgan, aka Dorsey McConnell. Photo/Andy Muhl, Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh[Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh] The Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh ordained its 8th diocesan bishop on Oct. 20 in a ceremony of reverence and ritual that included a touch of comedic drama.Moments after the sermon, and just before the assembled bishops were to examine and ordain the Rev. Dorsey W. M. McConnell, attention turned to man in a brown trench coat and hat making his way up the center aisle and introducing himself as Morgan, an early 20th century Welsh bridge builder who immigrated to Pittsburgh.“Bridges! Bridges are the most beautiful things in the world,” he shouted.Morgan, in fact, was McConnell, a one-time actor. He and a group of diocesan youth then performed a six-minute sketch that told a parable about Morgan’s heaven-inspired vision to build a splendid “bridge of the angels.” As the story goes, his idea was rejected by all, save for a few children who built a “rather unusual” prototype that would miraculously save dozens of families from the flood and resulting fires that ravaged Pittsburgh in 1936.The lesson was that God is in the business of building bridges for salvation and as “Morgan” McConnell repeatedly confessed, “Everything is possible with God!”The skit in that setting “made a clear statement that Bishop McConnell is someone from whom to expect the unexpected,” the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette noted in its coverage.Photo/Andy Muhl, Episcopal Diocese of PittsburghBridge-building in the City of Bridges has been a theme McConnell has sounded since his election last April and one he carried forward from his most recent post as rector of the Church of the Redeemer in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, and previous ministries in the dioceses of Olympia and New York.About 1,000 people filled the towering Gothic revival nave of Calvary Church for the ordination liturgy, which lasted almost three hours. McConnell will be formally seated at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in downtown Pittsburgh on Nov. 9.Photo/Andy Muhl, Episcopal Diocese of PittsburghPresiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori served as chief consecrator, along with co-consecrators that included bishops Kenneth L. Price (bishop suffragan of Southern Ohio and former provisional bishop of Pittsburgh); M. Thomas Shaw (bishop of Massachusetts); J. Clark Grew (retired bishop of Ohio); Edward S. Little (bishop of Northern Indiana); Paul V. Marshall (bishop of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania); and Evangelical Lutheran Church in America Bishop Kurt F. Kusserow of the Southwestern Pennsylvania Synod. In all, 20 bishops took part in the service.The House of Deputies was represented by its former president, the Very Rev. George L. W. Werner, dean emeritus of Pittsburgh’s Trinity Cathedral and current president of the diocesan Standing Committee.Nearly 300 lay members and clergy of the diocese participated in the day’s celebration. The sermon was preached by the Rev. Hurmon Hamilton, a minister in the Presbyterian Church (USA) and currently teaching pastor of the Abundant Life Christian Fellowship in Mountain View, California. He is a close friend and longtime associate of McConnell from their days serving in the Boston area.“God has the peculiar power of bringing good news out of crisis,” Hamilton said in a sermon that mirrored the theme of building bridges in a time of turmoil.That task will be aided, he said, when believers stop finding fault in others and instead confess their own failings, then come together to be healed and nourished by the Eucharist.“One of the amazing things about a service like this is that it brings us together, from the left and from the right, and all the places in between. And we come from our various perspectives, just convinced that we are right and everybody else is wrong,” he said as some in the congregation chuckled.“And as you stand before the Holy Eucharist there will be something within you that will quietly say, ‘Thank God for the crisis.’ Because out of the crisis, good news will come.”Of the four Episcopal Church dioceses (Fort Worth, Pittsburgh, Quincy and San Joaquin) to re-organize in recent years after a majority of former members voted to secede, Pittsburgh is the first to call and consecrate a permanent bishop.Pittsburgh is one of 27 dioceses in the Episcopal Church that grew in membership this past year.Currently the diocese includes 37 actively participating parishes with a total of approximately 9,050 members.The three bishops who helped the diocese rebuild after the 2008 split — Kenneth Price, Robert H. Johnson and David C. Jones — appeared together during the consecration to hand McConnell the diocesan crozier.During the announcements, McConnell introduced Betsy, his wife of 32-years, and their son, Evan, 22. The bishop also welcomed 31 members of his former parish and representatives of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, the union which he served for years as chaplain.A webcast of the consecration service can be view here.During her visit to the diocese, the presiding bishop met with diocesan clergy and spent part of an evening at a youth rally. On Oct. 21, she celebrated the Eucharist at the Church of the Holy Cross, a predominantly African-American congregation in Pittsburgh’s Homewood neighborhood.McConnell’s first visitation occurred the same day at St. Stephen’s Church in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania.— Rich Creehan is communication director for the Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh. Fr. John Merchant says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Pittsburgh ordains new bishop with pomp and a parable By Rich CreehanPosted Oct 23, 2012 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL Tags Bishop Consecrations, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CAlast_img read more


June 20, 2021 0

Urgent prayer, help needed for Iraq’s Christians

first_img Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Urgent prayer, help needed for Iraq’s Christians Youth Minister Lorton, VA Press Release Service Bud McAllister says: Rector Martinsville, VA By ACNS staffPosted Jun 16, 2014 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 June 16, 2014 at 4:21 pm “We’re all in this together; we all live downriver” Dartagna Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Fr. Stephen Stanley says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL June 26, 2014 at 4:50 pm Dear Brother Andrew,Every day I wear the Cross of Nails that you gave me when I last saw you at a CCN meeting, years ago. I pray for you and for your people in Iraq, whenever I put on this cross, which is my most treasured religious possession. I cannot imagine the horrors that you and your Christian people have been experiencing. But I also know that there is great faith and courage and God’s Grace in your community of St. George’s. I am committing some funds to your mission and support and will have my congregation pray for all of you and for Iraq. May God watch between us and between us and our people and between us and our enemies, that we all might be transformed and protected in His Love. Blessings in Christ’s Way, Stephen+ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Featured Events Middle East Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Comments are closed. Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL [Anglican Communion News Service] In the wake of the growing crisis in Iraq, a plea for prayer and help has been issued by the Diocese of Cyprus and the Gulf and the Anglican vicar of St George’s Church in Baghdad.An estimated half a million people, including hundreds of Christian families, are fleeing the area with many attempting to find refuge in the nearby Kurdish provinces of Northern Iraq. At least one Assyrian church in Mosul has been burned down in the recent violence.A statement from the diocese said that Christians are feeling particularly vulnerable, “especially in light of the treatment of Christians in the Raqqah province of northern Syria where ISIS* has also established its authority.“Recall that, in February 2014, ISIS commanders in Raqqah forced Christian community leaders to sign a contract agreeing to a set of stringent conditions. These included the payment of a special tax (known as jizya), conduct of Christian rites only behind closed doors so as to be neither visible nor audible to Muslims, and adherence to Islamic commercial, dress code and dietary regulations.“Mosul and the surrounding Nineveh plain is the traditional heartland of Iraq’s Christian communities. Many Christians fled to this region when forced to leave Baghdad and other areas in recent years. Christians are alarmed at the ISIS take-over of Mosul, fearful that this will further accelerate the decline of the Christian presence in Iraq.”The statement said Christians in the country have asked for prayer for the following issues:The Christians of Mosul will know the close presence of Jesus, the guidance of the Spirit and the protection of the FatherThose who have chosen to remain in the city would not be subjected to violent or unjust treatmentHumanitarian assistance would reach all who are in need, whether having been displaced or remaining in MosulChristians throughout Iraq will know the peace and presence of Jesus each day, and will remain faithful to him and clear in their testimonyThe Iraqi authorities will act decisively to improve security for all citizens of Iraq.Anglican vicar of St George’s Church in Baghdad, Canon Andrew White, also issued an appeal entitled “Please, please help us in this crisis”. Canon White who has lost hundreds of his congregation to the violence over the years, said Iraq was facing its worst crisis since 2003. “ISIS, a group that does not even see Al Qaida as extreme enough, has moved into Mosul, which is Nineveh. It has totally taken control, destroyed all government departments. Allowed all prisoners out of the prisons. Killed countless numbers of people. There are bodies over the streets. The army and police have fled, so many of the military resources have been captured. Tankers, armed vehicles and even helicopters are now in the hands of ISIS.”Writing on the Foundation for Relief and Reconciliation in the Middle East, Canon Andrew said his work at St George’s–providing a spiritual home, medical care and humanitarian relief as well as promoting reconciliation amongst different religious groups–is inevitably suffering.“The summer is by far our worst time of the year for support,” he writes. “Both our Foundation in the UK and US have seriously had to reduce our funding. We are in a desperate crisis. So many of our people had returned their homes in Nineveh for the summer now they are stuck in this total carnage unable to even escape. We desperately need help so that we can help the Christians of this broken land just get through this new crisis. Please can you help us, we are desperate.The terrible fact is that ISIS are in the control now of Fallujah in the South and Mosul in the North they could now move down towards Baghdad between the two and cause a total crisis there. So to be honest I don’t know what to do, do I stay or go back? I have a huge amount of commitments here. If I go back, I cannot change the situation but I want to be with my people. Here we are with this huge crisis and need and we do not even have the resources to help those most in need.”For more information on supporting Canon White’s ministry visit http://frrme.org/please-please-help-us-crisis/*the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Anglican Communion, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska Comments (2) Featured Jobs & Callslast_img read more


June 20, 2021 0

Iglesia de Kansas se arrepiente del trato que le dio…

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Miembros de la iglesia de San Pablo y algunos invitados se reúnen junto a la tumba de Mai DeKonza, 56 años después de su muerte, para la bendición y dedicación de una lápida sepulcral en lo que había sido hasta ahora una tumba sin nombre. Foto de Melodie Woerman/Diócesis de Kansas[Diócesis Episcopal de Kansas] En una reciente tarde dominical, la iglesia episcopal de San Pablo [St. Paul’s Episcopal Church] en Clay Center, Kansas, estaba repleta de fieles, entre ellos media docena de invitados de la capilla Ward de la Iglesia Metodista Episcopal Africana de la vecina Junction City.Se habían reunido el 20 de septiembre para un servicio de arrepentimiento, restauración y reconciliación con el fin de reconocer el mal trato de que había sido objeto el único miembro afroamericano que ha tenido esa iglesia en sus 134 años de historia: Mai DeKonza, que murió en 1959.Una y otra vez, la congregación rezaba: “perdónanos nuestros pecados. Perdónanos nuestros pecados. Perdónanos nuestros pecados”.DeKonza, que fue confirmada en 1900 en la pequeña iglesia del centro norte de Kansas, fue poeta, músico, dramaturga y prolífica escritora a quien la mayoría de sus correligionarios ignoró durante sus 59 años como miembro de la congregación. Su separación de ellos fue incluso más completa por el uso de un cáliz específicamente destinado a administrarle la comunión sólo a ella.Durante el oficio de arrepentimiento, feligreses e invitados cantan un himno cuya letra escribiera Mai DeKonza. Foto de Melodie Woerman/Diócesis de Kansas.Ahora, para contribuir a darle una voz en la iglesia, la cual ella no tuvo en vida, el oficio incluyo fragmentos de cartas que ella le había escrito al obispo James Wise, el cuarto obispo de Kansas, quien estuvo al frente de esa diócesis de 1916 a 1939, así como un himno que escribió y al que la organista parroquial, Sandra Carlson, le hizo un arreglo con la tonada Finlandia.Y cuando llegó el momento de la comunión, el único cáliz en el altar fue aquel que una vez habían reservado para DeKonza.En su sermón, la Rda. Lavonne Seifert, presbítera a cargo de la iglesia, dijo que el oficio tenía por finalidad abordar un doble pesar. “Hoy expresamos nuestro pesar por las acciones e inacciones de esos buenos cristianos que adoraban en la era de ‘la iglesia de la discriminación’, como Mai la describiera”, dijo Seifert. “Pero yo siento el mayor pesar por aquellos que nos precedieron y que perdieron la oportunidad de conocer realmente a Mai DeKonza y oír de su sabiduría, beneficiarse de sus conocimientos y disfrutar de su compañía”.El obispo de Kansas, Dean Wolfe, envío un comentario que se incluyó en el boletín del oficio: “Hoy, arrepintámonos de los pecados del prejuicio y del racismo y esforcémonos en ser el pueblo acogedor y amoroso que Dios nos ha llamado a ser. Digamos hoy ‘gracias’ a una mujer que no conocimos, y que sin embargo sigue enseñándonos mucho después de haberse unido a los santos en luz”.Hazel Washington, una afroamericana que se encontraba entre las personas que vinieron de la iglesia de la AME en Junction City, dijo que ella creía que el oficio “aportaba muchísima restauración”. Y añadió, “Siento que Dios está aquí”.DeKonza: músico, poeta, episcopal comprometidaLa actitud de la iglesia hacia DeKonza había sido reconocida en una historia escrita para el centenario de la parroquia en 1981. Ese relato definía el trato que le habían dado como “una mancha en la gloriosa historia de San Pablo” y hacía notar que durante años “ella fue tolerada, pero no aceptada”.Hazel Washington deposita flores en la tumba de Mai DeKonza. Foto de Melodie Woerman/Diócesis de Kansas.Pero la profundidad de esta alienación, y los talentos que DeKonza poseía, se mantuvieron ocultos hasta que Jim Beck y su esposa Ginny se mudaron para Clay Center cuando se jubilaron en 2013. Después que el leyó el relato de 1981, dijo que su preparación en el terreno de la psicología —él tiene un doctorado en este campo— lo llevó a preguntarse: “¿Cómo ocurrió esto?”Con licenciatura en historia y experiencia de investigar, así como un hobby en la esfera de la genealogía, comenzó a indagar. Encontró información en el museo de la localidad y en los archivos del censo, así como en los archivos de la Diócesis de Kansas.Beck supo que DeKonza nació en 1870, hija de un hombre blanco de Inglaterra y de una negra a quien el general de la Unión y senador federal James Lane libró de la esclavitud al traerla al estado libre de Kansas.Su nombre de pila era Elizabeth May Lawton, pero al cumplir 21 años se cambió legalmente el apellido a DeKonza como un reconocimiento a su querido estado natal. Se desconoce cuando comenzó a usar Mai como primer nombre, una adaptación de su segundo nombre.De niña, DeKonza contrajo la fiebre tifoidea que la dejó permanentemente discapacitada y en necesidad de usar muletas para caminar. Aunque ella sólo tenía una instrucción de octavo grado, trabajó como maestra de música, taquígrafa, costurera y empleada doméstica para tareas livianas.También compuso e interpretó música y escribió poesía y obras de teatro, algunas de las cuales se publicaron. Pronunció discursos y dio conferencias sobre la raza, y participó activamente en la política, incluido su apoyo a la Prohibición [de consumo de bebidas alcohólicas].Más tarde en su vida, y luego de ser atropellada por un auto, pasó la mayor parte del tiempo confinada en su casa.San Pablo, en Clay Center, colocó esta lápida en la tumba de Mai DeKonza, la única miembro negra en la historia de esta iglesia, como una señal de arrepentimiento por la falta de aceptación de que ella fue objeto de parte de la congregación durante su vida. Foto de Melodie Woerman/Diócesis de Kansas.Beck no pudo enterarse de lo que atrajo a DeKonza a la Iglesia Episcopal, pero en los archivos diocesanos encontró lo que él llamó un tesoro de 20 cartas de DeKonza al obispo Wise, y copias de algunas cartas de él a ella. En esas cartas “ella describía sus propias experiencias”, dijo Beck. “Eran como un diario”.En ellas compartía la profundidad de su compromiso con la fe y con la Iglesia Episcopal, a pesar del trato que recibía de sus cofeligreses.El 11 de abril de 1934, ella le escribió a Wise que, a pesar de su sentido de alienación de la iglesia, había intentado asistir al oficio de Pascua, haciendo el trayecto de 11 cuadras con sus muletas. Al llegar, descubrió que la iglesia había cambiado la hora del oficio, de las 8 a las 6:00 A.M. y que ella había llegado cuando la gente estaba acabando de desayunar.Al respecto escribió: “Y yo pensaba, mientras los veía disfrutando tan alegremente de la mañana de Pascua, que si la Iglesia les hubiera pedido que hicieran una caja de Pascua para los paganos de África, cuan alegremente habrían contribuido; pero nadie en San Pablo pensó en mí, de la raza africana, que me encontraba allí, para [obsequiarme] un huevo de Pascua, o una tarjeta, o un mensaje de júbilo, ni para sugerirme que me enviaban un bocado de su magnífico desayuno. Sencillamente me ignoraron”.Más tarde, cuando ella oyó decir que todos los episcopales negros podrían ser puestos bajo la jurisdicción del Rvdmo. Edward Demby, obispo sufragáneo para la obra [entre las personas] de color, dijo sencillamente que no acataría eso. Ella se sentía apegada al obispo de Kansas. Él había sido un pastor para ella cuando su clero local no lo había sido.Ella escribió: “Permítame afirmar este hecho, querido obispo, que todos los obispos de la Iglesia Episcopal, de todo el continente americano, respaldados por todos los obispos de la Iglesia de Inglaterra, no tendrían la fuerza suficiente para hacerme cambiar del obispo Wise al obispo Demby. Soy menuda y débil de cuerpo, pero ¿ha visto usted alguna vez mi espíritu?Beck también supo que cuando ella murió en 1959, su funeral tuvo lugar en una funeraria del pueblo; no en San Pablo, y que fue enterrada en una tumba sin nombre en la sección de los menesterosos del cementerio local.Hacer enmienda a través del arrepentimiento y una piedra tumbalA Beck le llevó casi seis meses concluir su investigación y compilarla en lo que se convirtió en un documento histórico de 19 páginas. Cuando los miembros de la congregación lo leyeron, supieron que tenían que hacer algo. Necesitaban hacer algún tipo de reparación respecto a cómo la iglesia —su amada iglesia— había tratado a DeKonza. Y tenían que poner una lápida sobre su tumba.Seifert sugirió que tuvieran un oficio para reconocer públicamente el mal comportamiento que San Pablo había tenido con su único miembro negro.Carolyn Garwood, la guardiana mayor de la iglesia, dijo que resultaba doloroso enterarse de la profundidad de la historia de DeKonza. Miembro de la iglesia de toda la vida, Garwood se dio cuenta de que su abuela habría sido una contemporánea de DeKonza. “Mi abuela era bastante tolerante —al menos yo creía que lo era— y nos enseñaba a respetar a las personas con discapacidades”, dijo Garwood. “Yo aprendí de ella la tolerancia. Esperaría que ella hubiera aceptado a Mai. Me asusta porque conozco a todas estas personas que yo no habría esperado que la ignoraran. Eso me hace sentir mal”.La Rda. Lavonne Seifert, sacerdote a cargo de San Pablo, consagra el vino en el cáliz que previamente se había reservado para el uso exclusivo de Mai DeKonza. En el oficio de arrepentimiento, toda la congregación recibió la comunión de él. Foto de Melodie Woerman/Diócesis de Kansas.Beck se preguntaba qué había sucedido con el cáliz reservado para el uso de DeKonza. Después de alguna indagación, aparecieron dos viejos cálices en el sótano de la iglesia. Él entonces le fue a pedir ayuda al Rdo. Frank Holtz, sacerdote jubilado en San Juan [St. John’s] en la vecina ciudad de Abilene. Holtz había crecido en San Pablo y, de adolescente, había sido el sacristán de la iglesia. Él le dijo a Beck que una vez había preguntado por un cáliz que había visto en el sótano de la iglesia y que le habían dicho, “ése es para la señora de color”. Beck llevó ambos cálices a Abilene y Holtz le señaló al que él recordaba. Seifert dijo que ella sabía que en el oficio que estaba planeando ese cáliz sería el único que se usaría.Los miembros de la iglesia también donaron dinero para hacer una lápida para su tumba, y un comité trabajó con la compañía local de monumentos para diseñarla: incluye el boceto de un cáliz, con un escudo episcopal que forma el cuenco y rodeado por una hiedra que, la compañía que hizo la tarja, les dijo que era un símbolo de fuerza.Seifert recibió autorización de la Diócesis de Virginia Sur para adaptar el oficio de arrepentimiento por la esclavitud que tiene esa diócesis. El oficio en Clay Center se llamó un “Oficio de arrepentimiento, restauración y reconciliación” e incluyó una variedad de himnos y música con el tema de la reconciliación, entre ellos “Lift Every Voice and Sing”, un himno de esperanza y profunda significación para la comunidad afroamericana.Después del oficio, la mayoría de los 75 feligreses que asistieron, se dirigieron en caravana al cementerio local para dedicar la nueva lápida en la tumba de DeKonza y poner flores en torno a su base. “Uno no puede restaurar algo que no se haya revelado”Heidi J. Kim, misionera m de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera para la reconciliación racial, dijo que los empeños de San Pablo muestran que sus miembros entienden lo que significa la reconciliación. “El pueblo de San Pablo ha dicho, ‘esto es una herida, y vamos a tratar de descubrir lo que ocurrió’”.(La Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society (DFMS) es el nombre con el cual la Iglesia Episcopal está incorporada, funciona empresarialmente y lleva a cabo la misión).El mirar con honestidad su propia historia, le dio a San Pablo la oportunidad de experimentar “una mutualidad de arrepentimiento y restauración”, dijo Kim. “Uno no puede restaurar algo que no se haya revelado”.Ella dijo que la profundidad del amor que los actuales miembros tienen por su iglesia provoca su sensación de dolor y de pena de que ese amor no se extendiera a DeKonza.Kim agregó que desde que supo lo que San Pablo había hecho, había compartido la noticia con otros en la Iglesia Episcopal, “y todo el mundo a quien se lo conté se ha conmovido hasta las lágrimas”, afirmó. “Esto es notable, y tengo prisa por compartirlo con toda la Iglesia”.El obispo jubilado Nathan Baxter, de Pensilvania Central, presidente honorario de la junta directiva de la Unión de Episcopales Negros, dijo en un correo electrónico que lo que hizo la gente de San Pablo fue “una increíble historia de gracia”. Él dijo que como obispo había oído hablar de algún feligrés negro en comunidades pequeñas y dispersas, pero pocas personas, incluido él, se habían detenido a preguntar sobre sus historias.Añadió que la labor de San Pablo de descubrir la verdad acerca de su relación con DeKonza muestra “que nunca es demasiado tarde para restaurar nuestras historias conscientes e inconscientes con la verdad, la confesión y los actos sinceros de penitencia colectiva”. Tales esfuerzos, subrayó, “cuando están bendecidos por la sinceridad, pueden convertirse en un testimonio liberador de la gracia cristiana para nosotros y para el mundo en nuestro entorno”.Un comienzo, no un finGarwood, la guardiana mayor de San Pablo, llamó al oficio del 20 de septiembre un comienzo importante, pero no puede ser un fin. “Tenemos que mantener esto en marcha”, afirmó “y alentar a otras parroquias a contar sus historias. Esto no puede pasar a un segundo plano. Tenemos que mantener el impulso”.Beck dijo que su investigación sobre la vida de DeKonza hace pertinente para él y sus cofeligreses encontrar “quiénes son los Mai DeKonzas de 2015 que viven en Clay Center, pero que han sido marginados”. Él se preguntó qué acciones realizadas por algunas personas hoy día causarán una vergüenza semejante a su comunidad dentro de cincuenta años.En su sermón, Seifert dijo que la iglesia ahora tiene la oportunidad y la responsabilidad de entender mejor el racismo sistémico y otros formas de opresión que dejan a las personas con una sensación de desesperanza. “Este es el momento”, afirmó ella “de dedicarnos nuevamente a notar a las Mai DeKonzas que encontramos aquí y ahora, a cuidar de ellas y a caminar con ellas”.Washington, de la iglesia AME de Junction City, dijo que le gustaría ver a congregaciones [compuestas] de diferentes personas reunirse, tal vez alrededor de Acción de Gracias. Y agregó que deben haber más oportunidades de compartir más allá de las diferencias raciales “no para corregir un error, sino porque es lo correcto”.– Melodie Woerman es directora de comunicaciones de la Diócesis Episcopal de Kansas. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. 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June 20, 2021 0

Recuerdan a víctimas de linchamiento en Georgia según se expanden…

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS El momento de develar en LaGrange, el 18 de marzo, una tarja histórica que recuerda a las víctimas de linchamiento en Georgia. Foto cortesía de Wesley Edwards.[Episcopal News Service] En uno de los rincones más sórdidos de la historia de Estados Unidos —el linchamiento de víctimas negras por agresores blancos—, los detalles de muchos de estos crímenes que se extendieron durante décadas han permanecido durante mucho tiempo como un misterio mientras investigadores actuales tratan de identificar a las víctimas y de aportar reconciliación racial a sus comunidades.Esos empeños han adquirido mayor auge en Georgia, donde el año pasado la Diócesis Episcopal de Atlanta inició una serie de peregrinaciones de tres años de duración que se proponía sacar a la luz a esas víctimas y sus historias. Al mismo tiempo, un grupo de residentes de LaGrange, una comunidad de Georgia centrooccidental, ha estado colaborando con la policía, con líderes cívicos y con las iglesias para enfrentar los casi olvidados linchamientos de la ciudad.“El viento del Espíritu está soplando … y llevándonos a comprender que, a fin de que la reconciliación racial tenga lugar, tenemos que enfrentar los linchamientos”, dijo Catherine Meeks, que dirige la Amada Comunidad: Comisión para el Desmantelamiento del Racismo de la Diócesis de Atlanta.Meeks encomia el trabajo del equipo de LaGrange, que se llama Troup Together, por el nombre del Condado de Troup, donde se encuentra el pueblo. La diócesis y Troup Together están llevando a cabo esfuerzos separados, pero paralelos, con objetivos semejantes: recordar a las víctimas de linchamiento, revelar sus historias inéditas y alentar la reconciliación racial.Casi dos años de trabajo de Troup Together culminó en enero en una disculpa pública del jefe de la policía Lou Dekmar por el papel de su departamento en el linchamiento de Austin Callaway en 1940. A Callaway lo encontraron gravemente herido en una carretera luego de haberlo extraído de una celda de la cárcel de LaGrange por una turba de blancos, una injusticia que los agentes de LaGrange consintieron.Y en marzo, pastores blancos hablaron en un oficio de la iglesia para confesar la complicidad de las congregaciones blancas en la muerte de Callaway y otros actos de violencia racial. A ese servicio siguió la dedicación de una tarja histórica en la iglesia metodista unida y el oficio en un cementerio en honor de Callaway y de más de 500 víctimas de linchamiento en el condado de Troup y en todo el estado.La iglesia episcopal de San Marcos [St. Mark’s Episcopal Church] se encuentra entre varias congregaciones de LaGrange que colaboran con Troup Together. La iglesia auspició un almuerzo para los familiares de Callaway y los de otras dos víctimas de linchamiento antes de que asistieran al oficio de la iglesia en marzo.“Si bien no podemos cambiar [el pasado], podemos reconocer su horror y hacer nuestra expiación”, dijo Janet Beall, educadora jubilada y miembro durante años de San Marcos, que asistió a las ceremonias junto con el rector de San Marcos, el Muy Rdo. R. Allen Pruitt.Troup Together surgió a partir de un grupo birracial en LaGrange que, hace dos años, leyó y debatió La cruz y el árbol del linchamiento [The Cross and the Lynching Tree] un libro publicado en 2011 por James H. Cone. La subsecuente investigación del equipo de historia local reveló información sobre el linchamiento de Callaway. Eso dio lugar a un oficio de oración en septiembre de 2015 para conmemorar los 75 años del crimen. Los esfuerzos de reconciliación han aumentado a partir de ahí.“Nuestro objetivo es aprender a amar a nuestros prójimos, y encuentro que no podemos hacer eso de una manera significativa a menos que conozcamos nuestras mutuas historias”, dijo Wesley Edwards, uno de los líderes de Troup Together. “Aunque vivamos en la misma comunidad no compartimos las mismas historias como grupos raciales, y hay muchas cosas que no conocemos ni apreciamos los unos de los otros más allá de las fronteras raciales”.El libro de Cone extrae un paralelo directo entre la muerte de Jesús en la cruz y el profundo sufrimiento de estadounidenses negros que se continuó después de la esclavitud en lo que se identifica como “la era del linchamiento”, de 1880 a 1940.“En esa era, el árbol del linchamiento y la cruz eran los símbolos cargados de mayor emoción en la comunidad afroamericana”, dice Cone. “Tanto la cruz como el árbol del linchamiento representaban lo peor de los seres humanos y, al mismo tiempo ‘una insaciable sed ontológica’ de una vida que rehúsa dejar que lo peor determine nuestro sentido último”.En las comunidades segregadas del Sur, el mensaje intencionado de un linchamiento era el miedo, dijo Meeks.“El propósito era aterrorizar a los negros y a cualquier blanco que fuera a simpatizar con los negros, luego el linchamiento tenía que ver con el terror”,  dijo Meeks. Sus raíces estaban en una amenaza de la sociedad estadounidense que sostenía una creencia en la supremacía de los blancos, dijo ella “y esa misma amenaza de la supremacía blanca sigue obsesionándonos en este país”.La Comisión sobre el Desmantelamiento del Racismo, cuyo programa de adiestramiento antirracista ha servido como modelo para otras diócesis episcopales, está laborando para honrar a las cerca de 600 personas que han muerto por linchamiento en Georgia. Su primera peregrinación, en octubre, atrajo a cerca de 200 personas a Macon, Georgia, y al sitio donde en 1922 una turba de linchadores lanzó el cadáver de John Glover (“Cockey”).La comisión tiene por delante un ajetreado 2017. Está planeada una segunda peregrinación, esta vez a Athens, en octubre, dijo Meeks, y su comisión está esforzándose para abrir un centro de recuperación racial cerca de Morehouse College en Atlanta para ese mes. La comisión también está alentando a las parroquias de la diócesis a exhibir la película 13th., acerca de la injusticia racial en el sistema de prisiones de Estados Unidos.Meeks y su equipo también quieren establecer un monumento permanente a las víctimas de linchamiento en Georgia que incorpore la lista de los nombres, semejante al Monumento en Memoria de los Veteranos de Vietnam en Washington, D.C. Meeks está en contacto con el Centro pro Derechos Civiles y Humanos en Atlanta como un sitio posible.“Hay un gran interés en esta idea”, dijo Meeks, calculando que hará falta un plazo de dos años para que el proyecto se concrete.Hay multitud de víctimas que recordar, entre ellas algunas cuyo preciso destino sigue siendo desconocido.Bobbie Hart, uno de los líderes de Troup Together, nunca supo del paradero de su abuelo paterno. Desapareció hace décadas mientras trabajaba en los ferrocarriles, y cuanto más Hart y su hermana han llegado a saber acerca de él y de su misteriosa desaparición tanto más se convencen de que resultó víctima de un linchamiento.Hart, que se crió como bautista y que ahora asiste a una iglesia metodista, conoce a parientes de Austin Callaway, pero era inconsciente del linchamiento hasta que trabajó en Troup Together con Edwards. Ella se sintió embargada por la emoción mientras asistía al oficio de oración por Callaway en 2015.“Sentí una tristeza que se apoderó de mí y sentí la necesidad de pedirle al Señor que perdonara a los hombres que les habían hecho esto”, dijo Hart, que ahora tiene 64 años. “Y sentí que eso era importante, siendo yo una mujer negra… Decidí perdonar esta injusticia”.– David Paulsen es redactor y reportero de Episcopal News Service. Pueden dirigirse a él a [email protected] Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Advocacy Peace & Justice, Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. 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June 20, 2021 0

Episcopal Divinity School, Union Theological Seminary agree on collaboration

first_imgEpiscopal Divinity School, Union Theological Seminary agree on collaboration Kelly Brown Douglas, scholar and racial justice activist, named EDS’s new dean Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tony Oberdorfer says: Robert B. Hunter says: Tags Theological Education Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 July 28, 2017 at 7:56 pm The sperm count of American males is declining, this matches the decline of American Christian Churches Brian MacFarland says: May 19, 2017 at 4:45 pm This is great news. As an EDS alum (MATS ’05) I was saddened by the decision to close the Cambridge campus. But this move feels just right! And to have Kelly Brown Douglas as the first dean! How fabulous. Under her leadership, EDS can continue its unique voice in the constellation of Episcopal seminaries with its decades long commitment to anti-oppression and anti-racism. Karen McLean Hessel says: May 20, 2017 at 1:09 am We already have an Episcopal seminary in New York, why the need for another? Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY May 19, 2017 at 4:21 pm I couldn’t be more excited about this partnership! In my work with Episcopal students at Union, over the years, it’s been clear that they are grounded within a justice framework deeply needed by our world. The scholarship represented by both institutions is remarkable. Kudos to all involved! Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments are closed. Rector Smithfield, NC Posted May 19, 2017 May 27, 2017 at 12:29 pm …or might this be the death knell for GTS, my alma mater? The decline of GTS over the past decade or so means it may have even more trouble drawing students in the NYC area if EDS is a viable alternative. I was involved for a time in meeting with prospective students while at GTS (2003-2006) and a common struggle they voiced was the dilemma of prospects receiving no financial support at GTS vis-a-vis a good deal of support at VTS. Reputation, ethos, etc., were issues for the prospects I spoke with, but for a number of them, practical and financial concerns were paramount. This was during a time when another one of our sister institutions had just closed, rather suddenly, and there was much concern over the viability of the seminary for the obvious reason that no one wanted to invest year or two and then be forced to leave or move. There are some serious concerns for Deans and Trustees in all of this. AMDG Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Les Singleton says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 June 4, 2017 at 11:36 am I was hugely saddened by the news that EDS would be closing. Its departure from Cambridge, and from Harvard Square, will impoverish theological discourse at Harvard, weaken student links to the Society of Saint John the Evangelist (SSJE) monastic community, and be bad for local parishes in the thriving Diocese of Massachusetts where EDS students interned. Furthermore, there is an alarming, and striking, even shocking, lack of mention of what will become of General Theological Seminary, what its relationship with Union Theological Seminary and the new, but only, in the view of many, so-called, EDS, in New York, will be, and what provision is being made for the care of future seminarians from New England. Though EDS was a “national” seminary, it had a huge impact in its relationships with Episcopal, and other, churches in New England. The silence on these matters, thus far, is huge, and terrible. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET John Rawlinson says: Rector Bath, NC May 19, 2017 at 5:55 pm total disaster. We give up Harvard, Cambridge, a wonderful campus, for a second rate troubled Union. EDS will die. alumni giving will dry up. General is already in NYC. EDS could have experimented in continuing ed, a retreat center, etc. the endowment could have kept the campus going, es. since the faculty are gone. May 20, 2017 at 10:59 pm What will happen to Jonathan Daniels? Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Cindy Savage-King says: May 20, 2017 at 9:48 am I wish a few years ago Seabury-Western had been a little more creative when they were charting their future. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Pamela G. Conrad says: Carol B. Clinton says: May 23, 2017 at 12:06 pm I do think that Kelly Brown Douglas is wonderful. With regard to “EDS” moving to NY, I must point out that since no faculty, staff, nor students are moving to Union, EDS is not moving– its endowment is moving. The Body of Christ is composed of people, not buildings. This is true for seminaries as well. I am EDS. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK [Episcopal Divinity School] Episcopal Divinity School (EDS) and Union Theological Seminary announced May 19 that they have signed an agreement that will allow EDS to continue as an Episcopal seminary through a collaboration with Union at its campus in New York City beginning in the fall of 2018.“We had three goals when we began to plan this news phase in EDS’s life,” said the Rev.  Gary Hall, chair of the EDS board. “We wanted to continue providing Episcopal theological education within an accredited, degree-granting program, deepen our historic commitment to gospel-centered justice, and provide financial strength and stability for EDS’s future. Today, I am delighted to say that we have achieved all three.”“This is an historic moment,” said the Rev. Serene Jones, president of the Union faculty and Johnston Family Professor for Religion and Democracy at Union. “We are honored that EDS has chosen to partner with us and are certain that the stewardship of our deepest commitments will be fulfilled in the years ahead.”The Rev. Kelly Brown Douglas will be the first dean of EDS at Union. Photo: Washington National CathedralEDS appointed the Rev. Kelly Brown Douglas, Susan D. Morgan Professor of Religion at Goucher College in Maryland and canon theologian at Washington National Cathedral, as the first dean of EDS at Union. Douglas will also join the Union faculty as a professor. She is the author of many articles and five books, including “Stand Your Ground:  Black Bodies and the Justice of God,” which was written in response to the murder of Trayvon Martin.“Kelly Brown Douglas is one of the most distinguished religious thinkers, teachers, ministers, and activists in the nation,” Jones said. “We are confident that Union’s longstanding commitment to both the Gospel and social justice will be strengthened and enhanced under her leadership.”Ordained as an Episcopal priest in 1983, Douglas holds a master’s degree in theology and a Ph.D. in systematic theology from Union. Her academic work focuses on womanist theology, sexuality and the black church, and she is a sought-after speaker and author on issues of racial justice and theology.“Kelly is an Episcopal Church leader and an eminent scholar—and she is a daughter of Union,” Hall said. “Working together, EDS and Union aim to advance the causes of social justice and theology in the world and Kelly is the ideal leader for this new venture.”“I am excited for the challenge,” Douglas said. “What I am really happy about for the wider EDS community is that this isn’t the typical bad news of a small seminary closing. This is the news that this place believed enough in its mission that it went out and found a way to carry that mission forward in a viable fashion, and found a way for the mission to grow. EDS is going to continue. The EDS community has found the platform to do that, and they have found in UTS an institution that shares their mission. I feel privileged to be a part of this next chapter in EDS’ life.”Beginning in 2018, students who enroll in the EDS program at Union will earn graduate degrees from Union and also fulfill requirements for ordination in the Episcopal Church. In addition to Douglas, EDS will hire a professor of Anglican studies to join the four Episcopal priests currently on Union’s faculty.“I look forward to the amazing possibilities that will be brought forth through this affiliation,” said Union’s Board Chair Wolcott B. Dunham Jr. “Our work together will surely expand the ways we serve the church and the world.” A lifelong Episcopalian, Dunham is also senior warden of St. James’ Episcopal Church in the City of New York and a former trustee of the Episcopal Diocese of New YorkEDS plans to purchase a floor in a new building being constructed at Union that will house offices, residential space for the dean, and other facilities. The EDS campus in Cambridge will be sold after operations there cease in July, and the proceeds will be added to the school’s endowment, currently valued at $53 million.The EDS board has voted to cap spending at four percent of its endowment once expenses associated with the move to Union are paid. “We are in this for the long haul,” said Bonnie Anderson, vice chair of the EDS board.  “Enshrining our commitment to sensible, sustainable spending in our affiliation agreement was important to us.”EDS alums will enjoy the same library and campus privileges accorded to Union alums. The EDS library and archives will be reviewed by representatives from both schools and Union will accept items that do not duplicate its own holdings. The Burke Library at Union, part of Columbia University’s library system and one of the largest theological libraries in North America, with holdings of more than 700,000 items.The initial term of the EDS-Union affiliation agreement is eleven years, and both schools have the option to agree to extensions beyond that time. EDS will remain its own legal entity with its own board of trustees.The two seminaries began negotiations in February after Union was chosen from among nine potential candidates that expressed interest in an alliance with EDS. The EDS board, spurred by financial challenges that were depleting the school’s endowment, voted in 2016 to cease granting degrees in May 2017 and to explore options for EDS’s future.EDS has adopted a generous severance plan for its faculty and staff. All students who did not complete their degrees this month are being “taught out” at other seminaries with EDS’s financial support so as to avoid additional costs.About Union Theological SeminaryUnion Theological Seminary in the City of New York is a seminary and a graduate school of theology established in 1836 by founders “deeply impressed by the claims of the world upon the church.” Union prepares women and men for committed lives of service to the church, academy and society. A Union education develops practices of mind and body that foster intellectual and academic excellence, social justice, and compassionate wisdom. Grounded in the Christian tradition and responsive to the needs of God’s creation, Union’s graduates make a difference wherever they serve.Union believes that a new interreligious spirituality of radical openness and love is the world’s best hope for peace, justice, and the care of God’s creation. Empowered by groundbreaking inquiry aligned with practical realism and a bias for action, Union is charting a profound new course for enduring social change. Union’s graduates stand out wherever they serve, practicing their vocations with courage and perseverance, and speaking clearly and acting boldly on behalf of social justice in all of its forms.About Episcopal Divinity SchoolEpiscopal Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts was formed in 1974 by the merger of Philadelphia Divinity School (1857) and Episcopal Theological School (1867). For more than 40 years, EDS has offered a bold and expansive vision of inclusion and social justice in the service of preparing students to lead faith communities.In July 2016, the EDS Board of Trustees voted to cease granting degrees in May 2017 and to explore options for EDS’s future that would carry on the seminary’s historic mission, continue accredited degree-granting theological education, and provide financial strength and stability for EDS’s future. More information is available here. henry idema says: Featured Events May 27, 2017 at 12:27 pm …or might this be the death knell for GTS, my alma mater? The decline of GTS over the past decade or so means it may have even more trouble drawing students in the NYC area if EDS is a viable alternative. I was involved for a time in meeting with prospective students while at GTS (2003-2006) and a common struggle they vooced was the dilemma of prospects receiving no financial support at GTS vis-a-vis a good deal of support at VTS. Reputation, ethos, etc., were issues for the prospects I spoke with, but for a number of them, practical and financial concerns were paramount. This was during a time when another one of our sister institutions had just closed, rather suddenly, and there was much concern over the viability of the seminary for the obvious reason that no one wanted to invest year or two and then be forced to leave or move. There are some serious concerns for Deans and Trustees in all of this. AMDG Rector Collierville, TN Gloria Payne -Carter says: Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Fr. Jeff Hulet says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Comments (19) James Meredith Day says: Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID May 19, 2017 at 8:30 pm I was thinking along to the same lines. With a move to NYC, why did they not explore a partnership with General. Lallie Lloyd says: May 20, 2017 at 1:14 pm Makes perfect sense for these times … one thing, please have what is left of the old PDS library placed where independent scholars can access it. The Philadelphia/Boston mix was unique and may have contributed to so much amazing work done by so many early ‘institutional’ church leaders…. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Daniel Anderson Toler says: May 27, 2017 at 11:14 am It would seem that Identity Politics is now in the ascendancy in various parts of the church and, ironically, transforming Christian ministry at the service of all persons – whether Democrat, Green, Independent, Libertarian, or Republican – into a much more narrowly conceived commitment to particular emphases – an ironic reversal of the hard-won baptismal and expansive ecclesiology of a truly catholic community. I strongly support the BCP baptismal renunciations and promises that do not narrow pastoral ministry to one or two laudable concerns. Samuel Torvend says: May 19, 2017 at 11:46 pm This is beyond sad. Makes no sense that EDS didn’t partner with General. None. And sitting on a $53 million dollar endowment why didn’t they make someone (General, Union) come to them??? I’m sure EDS’s so-called “trustees” are patting themselves on the back but they shouldn’t. They destroyed a wonderful, historical school. “EDS” (why are they even calling it that???) will never get one penny from me. May 24, 2017 at 1:37 pm I agree with the criticism. The problem is that in recent years EDS had drifted so far to the left politically (like the nearby Harvard Divinity School) that serious Episcopalians could no longer take the place seriously. This clearly accounted for many of the financial problems that finally did the school in. Susanne Watson Epting says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Fr. Jeff Hulet says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY May 20, 2017 at 7:05 pm A few short years ago there was an effort to de-centralize the Church, and move some functions outside New York, now we have a counter move– co-locating seminaries in New York. Perhaps the Union-EDS collaborative should begin to negotiate with Virginia Seminary to move to New York, and then Nashotah House, and then . . . . Since New York is a high cost area, then we could mount a huge effort to raise money to help seminarians cover the costs of living in New York. We should be delighted to have a New York base, since that will equip graduates for the many small and rural congregations in the Church. This is another decision to mark the Episcopal Church as the church of the elite. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books May 19, 2017 at 9:01 pm Great collaborative. Just what The Jesus Movement needs in raising up new leaders in The Episcopal Church for the long haul. Congratulations. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Christine Janis says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis May 19, 2017 at 5:55 pm Thrilled with this news. Kelly Brown Douglas is a great choice for this new role. I celebrate this positive outcome and fantastic future for Kelly and these important institutions. (When I was an M. Div. Student at Union I actually took a memorable joint course with EDS & UTS.) And I was honored to have been a sister student when Kelly was at Union. Her recent book, Stand Your Ground: Black Bodies and the Justice of God offers an essential theological, ethical perspective for an important conversation. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJlast_img read more


June 20, 2021 0

Churches urged to set aside day for beach clean-up

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events Rector Belleville, IL [Anglican Communion News Service] Anglicans and other Christians throughout the world are being encouraged to take part in a coordinated beach clean-up project in September 2018. The third Saturday in September is recognized by the conservation community as International Coastal Clean-up Day. The Environmental Network of the Anglican Church of Southern Africa is joining forces with the Christian environment network, A Rocha International, and other partners to encourage Christians around the world to take part in next year’s Coastal Clean-up Day, on Sept. 15, 2018.Read the entire article here. Rector Smithfield, NC Anglican Communion Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Posted Oct 13, 2017 Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Churches urged to set aside day for beach clean-up Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR last_img read more


June 20, 2021 0

Voici le guide récapitulatif des principales questions qui seront abordées…

first_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI La 79ème Convention générale débute officiellement le 5 juillet et se poursuit jusqu’au 13 juillet au Centre de conventions d’Austin. Photo : Centre de conventions d’Austin[Episcopal News Service — Austin (Texas)] Les épiscopaliens commencent à arriver ici avant le 5 juillet, date officielle du début de la 79ème Convention générale au Centre de conventions d’Austin.Comme à l’accoutumée, l’ordre du jour qui attend la Chambre des Évêques et la Chambre des Députés est si rempli que les réunions des comités législatifs sont fixées aux 3 juillet au soir et 4 juillet au matin. La version préliminaire du programme complet de la convention se trouve ici. La Convention s’achève le 13 juillet.Pour consulter le guide général de la convention, veuillez vous reporter à l’article d’Episcopal News Service intitulé « Episcopalians preparing for 79th General Convention in Austin can expect ‘a real Texas welcome’ » [Les épiscopaliens qui se préparent pour la 79ème Convention générale à Austin peuvent s’attendre à « une véritable bienvenue texane »].Voici le récapitulatif de certains des principaux travaux qui seront accomplis à la Convention générale :Égalité face au mariageLe Groupe de travail sur l’étude du mariage à la Convention générale a suivi de près l’utilisation de deux nouveaux rites de mariage que la Convention générale a approuvés en 2015 pour une période d’essai (Résolution A054), à l’intention à la fois des couples de même sexe et des couples de sexe opposé, et il a connaissance de certaines préoccupations concernant l’accès inégal à ces liturgies à l’essai. Dans son rapport dans le Livre bleu, il dit avoir trouvé une large acceptation du rite dans toute l’église, exception faite de huit évêques diocésains dans 101 diocèses nationaux qui n’ont pas autorisé leur emploi.« Liturgical Resources 1: I Will Bless You, and You Will Be a Blessing » [Ressources liturgiques 1 : je vous bénirai et vous serez une bénédiction] est l’un des rites dont la Convention générale a autorisés l’emploi à l’essai en 2015. Photo : Church Publishing Inc.Le groupe de travail propose que la convention exige que tous les évêques en ayant le pouvoir « prennent des dispositions pour que tous les couples demandant à se marier dans l’église aient un accès raisonnable et commode à ces rites à l’essai ». Il fera également dire lors de la convention que les évêques « continueront leur travail de mener l’église dans un engagement total envers ces documents et continueront d’apporter une réponse pastorale généreuse qui satisfasse les besoins des membres de l’église”.Les épiscopaliens qui soutiennent cet effort ont été actifs dès avant la convention. Claiming the Blessing [Revendiquant la bénédiction], qui a été formé en 2002 pour défendre la « pleine inclusion de tous les baptisés dans tous les sacrements de l’église », selon son site Web, a publié un plaidoyer. Certains épiscopaliens du Diocèse de Dallas ont élaboré un site Web appelé « Dear General Convention » [Chère Convention générale] qui comporte des vidéos et des récits écrits sur les couples qui ne peuvent se marier dans ce diocèse.Le groupe de travail demande également la poursuite de la période d’essai des liturgies en tant qu’ajout au Livre de la prière commune ainsi que des modifications au livre de prière ayant trait à d’autres rites de mariage ainsi que des préfaces et des parties du catéchisme pour rendre le libellé non sexospécifique.Cinq évêques diocésains de la Province IX et un évêque en retraite représentant les diocèses d’Équateur Littoral, Équateur Central, République dominicaine, Venezuela et Honduras ont prévenu le groupe de travail que, si la convention effectuait des modifications concernant le mariage qui les forceraient à « accepter des pratiques sociales et culturelles qui n’ont aucun fondement biblique ni acceptation dans le culte chrétien », la mesure « approfondirait grandement la brèche, la division et la Province IX devrait apprendre à faire son chemin seule ». Les évêques de Colombie et de Porto Rico n’ont pas signé la déclaration.Le 28 juin, l’évêque de Long Island Lawrence Provenzano, l’évêque de Pittsburgh Dorsey McConnell et l’évêque du Rhode Island Nicholas Knisely ont proposé la Résolution B012, qui continuerait la période d’essai des rites de mariage, sans limite de temps et sans chercher à réviser le Livre de la Prière commune de 1979. La résolution propose que l’accès aux liturgies soit donné dans tous les diocèses, sans exiger l’autorisation de l’évêque diocésain. Au lieu de cela, les congrégations souhaitant utiliser les rites mais dont les évêques ont refusé l’autorisation, pourraient recevoir d’un autre évêque de l’église un DEPO (Delegated Episcopal Pastoral Oversight) qui leur donnerait accès à ces liturgies.Un article antérieur d’Episcopal News Service sur la question de l’accès au mariage se trouve ici.Le groupe de travail propose également deux liturgies pour la bénédiction des relations de couples qui choisissent de ne pas se marier pour des raisons juridiques ou financières. Il recommande aussi que l’église réfléchisse à de nouvelles manières de servir le nombre grandissant de gens qui cohabitent dans une relation engagée et monogame plutôt que de se marier. La couverture par ENS de ces recommandations se trouve ici.Révision du Livre de la Prière commune ?La Convention générale de cet été est invitée à examiner comment elle ordonne sa prière commune et pourquoi.La Commission permanente en matière de Liturgie et de Musique (ci-après dénommée SCLM) propose aux évêques et aux députés un plan global de révision, comme l’a demandé la Convention générale de 2015, ainsi qu’une manière pour l’église de prendre le temps de discerner la forme future de sa prière commune. La première option entrainerait immédiatement l’église dans un processus majeur de révision du livre de prière qui s’achèverait dans neuf ans. La deuxième demanderait à l’église de sonder les profondeurs de la théologie actuelle du Livre de la Prière commune ainsi que son utilité en tant qu’outil d’unité dans une église diversifiée, en matière d’évangélisation et de discipulat. Si la convention convient de la seconde approche, ceci inclurait de nouvelles traductions du Livre.La SCLM a inclus des « hypothèses directrices », des plans de travail, des suggestions de méthodes et d’outils, des centaines de pages de documents complémentaires et des budgets pour chacune des approches. Les approches sont décrites dans la partie du rapport de la SCLM publié le 13 février dans le Livre Bleu . Le rapport du sous-comité pour le livre de prière se trouve ici.Un article d’Episcopal News Service sur les possibilités se trouve ici.L’Église épiscopale et le mouvement #MeTooLa Convention va réfléchir au rôle de l’Église épiscopale et à sa réponse au mouvement #MeToo par des résolutions, des réflexions et un espoir de réconciliation.Pour ce qui pourrait être une séance extraordinaire, la Chambre des Évêques invite les épiscopaliens le 4 juillet à un événement intitulé « Liturgie de l’écoute ». La séance, prévue de 17h15 à 19h00 heure d’Austin, dans le lieu de prière installé au Centre de conventions d’Austin, a été dénommé « un espace sacré pour l’écoute et la réconciliation ».Entretemps, près de 30 résolutions sur ce sujet ont été déposées. La majorité d’entre elles provient des 47 membres du Comité spécial de la Chambre des députés en matière de harcèlement sexuel et exploitation, nommé en février par la révérende Gay Clark Jennings, présidente des Députés.Un article d’Episcopal News Service sur ce même sujet se trouve ici.Un salaire pour le président de la Chambre des DéputésPrésider la Chambre des Députés n’est que l’une des nombreuses responsabilités du président de la Chambre des Députés qui sont exigées canoniquement. Photo : Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceCette question, qui a déclenché un rare comité de conférence entre évêques et députés dans les dernières heures de la dernière convention, sur la question de savoir si le poste actuellement non rémunéré de président de la Chambre des Députés devrait être salarié, va de nouveau être examinée.La convention de 2015 a demandé que l’évêque primat et le président de la Chambre des Députés nomment un groupe de travail pour étudier la question. La question de rémunération pour ce poste a fait l’objet de débats depuis des décennies et le Groupe de travail visant à étudier Direction de l’église et rémunération, a conclu que le travail du président de la Chambre des Députés équivaut à un travail à plein temps. Sa Résolution A-028 demande un salaire mais n’en fixe pas le montant. Le groupe de travail a demandé au Conseil exécutif d’inclure un salaire dans son avant-projet de budget 2019-2021. Le Conseil a budgété 900 000 dollars pour un salaire à plein temps avec avantages sociaux pour trois ans.Les partisans du changement disent que faire de ce poste un emploi rémunéré élargira le réservoir de candidats en mesure d’envisager de se présenter à l’élection. D’autres ne sont pas d’accord, certains disant qu’ils craignent une « dérive de la mission » sous la forme d’une expansion des responsabilités et du pouvoir du président.Un groupe d’évêques a proposé un compromis sous la forme de la Résolution B014 qui demanderait au Conseil exécutif de verser au président des jetons de présence d’administrateur « pour services spécifiques rendus dans l’accomplissement de ses responsabilités requises par la Constitution et les Canons de l’église ».Un article d’Episcopal New Service sur cette question se trouve ici.Et la Résolution C042, proposée par la Province IV de l’église, verserait au président ce que l’on appelle une indemnité journalière pour certains aspects de son travail puis réétudierait la question plus vaste de la rémunération.Suivi des trois priorités de l’église : l’évangélisation, la réconciliation et la justice raciales, et le respect de la créationLa majeure partie du débat sur l’évangélisation à la Convention générale sera centrée sur la continuation du soutien accru de l’église à l’implantation d’églises et de nouveaux ministères régionaux, comme prévu dans la Résolution A005. Mais d’autres résolutions attribuées au Comité d’évangélisation et d’implantation d’églises montrent la large gamme de réflexion sur ce fertile terrain spirituel, y compris le rôle des médias sociaux et les liens entre l’évangélisation et la gestion de l’environnement. Le comité examinera également une proposition qui accorderait davantage d’attention à la façon dont l’origine démographique des responsables de ministère reflète celle des communautés qu’ils cherchent à servir.L’Évêque Primat Michael Curry au pied de la statue de Robert E. Lee à Charlottesville (État de Virginie), le 7 sept. 2017, avec le rév. Paul Walker, recteur de la Christ Episcopal Church voisine. La statue avait été enveloppée de plastique tandis que la ville était confrontée à une contestation en justice s’opposant à l’enlèvement du monument. Photo : David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceUne série d’incidents raciaux choquants dans les mois précédant la 78ème Convention générale, notamment le massacre perpétré à l’Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church à Charleston (État de Caroline du Sud), avaient contribué à stimuler l’adoption à Salt Lake City d’un certain nombre de résolutions sur le racisme. Parmi celles-ci, la Résolution C019, qui demandait aux dirigeants de l’église d’élaborer une réponse à l’injustice raciale pour toute l’église. Comment mener ces efforts jusqu’au bout est la question fondamentale qui est posée au Comité de justice et réconciliation raciales. Mais le racisme et l’apaisement racial sont des sujets si vastes, tant sur le plan social que spirituel, que l’on s’attend à ce que les débats s’étendent bien au delà d’une simple résolution, voire même d’un seul comité. Parmi les autres résolutions qui seront débattues en figure une qui étudie les antécédents de l’église en matière de diversification de ses dirigeants et une autre qui pose la question de savoir si le terme anti-racisme doit être remplacé par un terme qui fasse allusion à la transformation spirituelle recherchée dans ces travaux.Le soutien aux agriculteurs locaux, aux taxes et crédits carbone, l’opposition au racisme environnemental et la participation soutenue des épiscopaliens à l’Accord de Paris sur le climat sont quelques-unes des résolutions en matière de gestion de l’environnement et de respect de la création qui seront débattues à la 79ème Convention générale. Une liste de résolutions sur la gestion et le respect de la création se trouve ici.Formulation du budget triennal 2019-2021Le Comité permanent conjoint Programme, Budget & Finance (PB&F) a déjà commencé ses travaux sur l’avant-projet de budget triennal 2019-2021 que le Conseil exécutif a adopté en janvier.Le revenu total de 133,7 millions de dollars de l’avant-projet de budget du conseil paierait un montant égal de dépenses, avec un très petit excédent de 2 654 dollars. Le budget triennal dépasse d’environ 8,7 millions de dollars celui qui a été approuvé par la Convention générale de 2015 pour le triennat 2016-2018 actuel.Lors de la Convention générale de 2015, les évêques et les députés ont transformé le système actuel de quote-part volontaire en une évaluation obligatoire, à compter du cycle budgétaire 2019-2021. L’avant-projet du Conseil prévoit que jusqu’à 20 diocèses obtiennent des exonérations entières ou partielles de ces paiements dans le cadre du système qui entrera en vigueur pour le nouveau triennat.Il sera demandé au PB&F d’étudier la Résolution B001 de rejet de l’évaluation obligatoire systématique et d’adoption d’un système de financement diocésain du budget triennal de l’église sur la base du montant que chaque diocèse dépense en moyenne par congrégation dans son budget annuel.PB&F prévoit une audience publique sur le budget à 19h30 le 5 juillet. Son budget définitif doit être présenté lors d’une séance conjointe des Chambres des Évêques et des Députés au plus tard le troisième jour avant l’ajournement prévu de la Convention. Selon la version préliminaire du programme de la Convention, cette présentation est fixée à 10h30 heure d’Austin le 11 juillet.Paix au Moyen-OrientL’Évêque Primat Michael Curry, à gauche, et Suheil Dawani, l’Archevêque anglican de Jérusalem, marchent le 26 mars dans la zone désertique entre un poste de contrôle israélien et la ville de Gaza. Ils se rendaient à l’hôpital anglican Al Ahli Arab. Leur voyage s’est déroulé cinq jours avant que la violence n’éclate le long de la clôture qui sépare Israël et la bande de Gaza. Photo : Sharon JonesDe nombreuses résolutions de la Convention générale sont attendues sur des sujets ayant trait à Israël et la Palestine d’ici le moment où démarre la convention. Au moins trois ont été soumises jusqu’à présent, dont une proposée par le Diocèse de Californie qui réintroduit une pression pour le désinvestissement de « ces sociétés qui profitent de l’occupation par Israël des terres palestiniennes ou dont les produits ou actions soutiennent l’infrastructure de l’occupation ».L’engagement des entreprises ne sera pas le seul sujet relatif à la Terre Sainte. Deux autres propositions de résolutions demandent qu’une plus grande attention soit prêtée au sort des enfants palestiniens, notamment ceux qui sont poursuivis devant les tribunaux militaires israéliens.Un groupe d’évêques et de députés à qui l’on a demandé de trouver un moyen de naviguer les débats souvent épineux de la politique de l’Église épiscopale envers Israël et la Palestine, a annoncé ses recommandations pour susciter un débat ouvert et productif sur ces questions lors de la Convention. Un article d’Episcopal News Service sur cette initiative se trouve ici.Comment suivre les travaux de la Convention généraleUn pôle médias, géré par le Bureau de la Communication de l’Église épiscopale, offre à tous et partout la possibilité de suivre les travaux de la Convention. Y seront inclus des diffusions en direct de séances de la Chambre des Évêques et de la Chambre des Députés, un programme, les services religieux quotidiens et les conférences de presse quotidiennes. Les gros titres d’Episcopal News Service seront annoncés sur le site. Vous pouvez trouver le pôle médias ici.Le pôle médias offre la possibilité de suivre les travaux de la Convention. Y seront inclus des diffusions en direct de séances de la Chambre des Évêques et de la Chambre des Députés, un programme, les services religieux quotidiens et les conférences de presse quotidiennes. Les gros titres d’Episcopal News Service seront annoncés sur le site.The media hub offers the opportunity to follow convention’s proceedings. It will include live streams of sessions from the House of Bishops and the House of Deputies, a calendar, daily worship and daily media briefings. Episcopal News Service’s headlines will feed into the site.Ceux qui ne sont ni évêques ni députés peuvent suivre l’avancement des résolutions législatives par le biais du dénommé Classeur virtuel ici. Le site reflète la configuration des iPads prêtés aux évêques et aux députés et les modifications se font en temps réel. La version en ligne comprend également l’ordre du jour quotidien de chaque Chambre, les programmes de chaque jour et les journaux (c’est-à-dire la liste des messages envoyés entre les chambres informant l’autre des mesures prises), les programmes et les rapports des comités. Elle contient des onglets pour vérifier les mesures en cours et les amendements proposés par l’assemblée dans chaque Chambre.En outre, une application gratuite est disponible pour tout smartphone ou tablette sur Android 4.4 ou IOS 8.0 ou plus récent. L’appli contient les horaires, les cartes, les informations fournisseurs, les ordres quotidiens des services religieux et d’autres documents utiles.Téléchargez l’appli ici ou sur App Store ou Google Play puis saisir le code 79GC lorsque vous y êtes invité. L’application peut également être utilisée sur un ordinateur. Le lien se trouve ici.— Ce guide a été compilé à partir de reportages des rédacteur/reporters David Paulsen et Mary Frances Schjonberg d’Episcopal News Service, et de la rédactrice en chef d’ENS Lynette Wilson. General Convention 2018 Tags Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Press Release AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Voici le guide récapitulatif des principales questions qui seront abordées lors de la 79ème Convention générale à Austin Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Youth Minister Lorton, VA center_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing General Convention, Rector Albany, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events du personnel ENSPosted Jul 4, 2018 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NClast_img read more


June 20, 2021 0

UN Human Rights Council to hear of Anglican efforts to…

first_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC [Anglican Communion News Service] Efforts by Anglicans and Episcopalians to tackle human trafficking in Ghana, Hong Kong, the U.S. and the U.K. will be brought to the attention of the U.N. Human Rights Council this week. The Anglican Communion’s Permanent Representative to the U.N., Jack Palmer-White, will tell the U.N. Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women that faith organizations have a key role to play in preventing trafficking in women and girls in the context of global migration. The committee is hosting a general discussion on the issue on Feb. 22 to help it prepare a “general recommendation” for U.N. member states.Read the full article here. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Anglican Communion, Human Trafficking Course Director Jerusalem, Israel AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Belleville, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 center_img Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York UN Human Rights Council to hear of Anglican efforts to combat human trafficking Featured Events Press Release Service The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Tags Posted Feb 19, 2019 Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 last_img read more


June 20, 2021 0

Alabamians, Episcopalians battle it out over gumbo

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Toni North and the Birmingham Soul Sisters won the 2018 Chef’s Choice Seafood Award at the 2018 Gumbo Gala, the biggest Episcopal event in Alabama. Photo: Sara Walker[Episcopal News Service] After Hurricane Katrina disrupted people’s lives across the Gulf Coast, inland cities welcomed the displaced and strangers offered shelter and services. For some evacuees to Birmingham, Alabama, the hospitality became permanent, and the influx led to a hugely successful Episcopal fundraising event celebrating the distinctive comfort food called gumbo.At least 3,000 partiers are expected May 4 for the Gumbo Gala, now in its 14th year as the largest Episcopal event in Alabama. The Gumbo Gala annually raises $100,000 for Episcopal Place, which provides 141 units of affordable housing and independent living in Birmingham for seniors and adults with disabilities.According to Episcopal Place’s history, a “mustard seed” started all this in the 1970s when an elderly Episcopalian wrote to then-Bishop Furman Stough about no longer being able to live by herself and having no place to go. The gumbo competition that started in the wake of Katrina today enables Episcopal Place to care for older adults with fixed or limited incomes who cannot afford rising apartment rents or maintain a home.The Episcopal Church of the Holy Apostles vied for the Most Divine Gumbo trophy and the Spirit Award at the 2018 Gumbo Gala. Photo: Sara WalkerGet the dog!In August 2005 as Hurricane Katrina approached the Mississippi coast, Lynnes Thompson told his wife Linda, “Get the dog! We’re gone.” The storm destroyed their home as the couple headed to family in Birmingham, 350 miles northeast of New Orleans.Because Linda Thompson has chronic health issues, the couple needed somewhere stable near medical facilities, like Episcopal Place. Within a month, they and their dog moved in, as did three other couples from Katrina’s path.“For these survivors, initially it was about shelter and food. Then it was dealing with emotional and mental health issues,” recalled Episcopal Place social worker Shannon Atchenson. “One couple had lost a dog. There was some depression and anxiety. We wanted to give residents a sense of belonging because, when you’ve lost your home, that’s important.”Residents don’t have to pay for supportive services like transportation, food delivery and pet care; those are covered by donations to the Episcopal Church Foundation and volunteers. With need rising in the hurricane aftermath, Episcopal Place knew “we weren’t going to get support from the government for the Katrina people or for anyone,” Atchenson said.Meanwhile, as a way of settling in, Lynnes Thompson, a Baptist, began a nondenominational Bible study at Episcopal Place.“Episcopal Place has done more than their part for all of us,” said Lynnes Thompson, now 78. “It’s quite expensive to operate a place like this that’s so good.”Food prep at the 2018 Gumbo Gala, the biggest Episcopal event in Alabama. Photo: Sara WalkerRising water, changing directionA year before Katrina, Hurricane Ivan had flooded Episcopal Place. Staff sent out an SOS, and Amanda Ward, Episcopal Place’s activities and volunteer coordinator, recruited her classmate Matt Ennis to help. The power was out at his corporate job, so he didn’t mind wet vacuuming the flood water at Episcopal Place.Volunteering that day made him realize that he wanted to work closer with people in need. The next day Ennis quit his job. He was a volunteer supporting Ward’s fundraising efforts at Episcopal Place when Katrina hit.“Amanda and I had seen how a chili cook-off was a good business model because you charge people to cook and to eat,” said Ennis, a member of All Saints’ in Birmingham. “We had these new residents from Hurricane Katrina, so how about gumbo?”Despite running out of the main attraction, the first Gumbo Gala raised almost $10,000 for Episcopal Place, with jazz and a second line parade that celebrated the Gulf Coast evacuees. Over time, it created even more community pride as Episcopal Place residents competed with their own gumbos and felt supported by their Birmingham neighbors.Ennis married Ward in 2007, built a nonprofit fundraising firm and every year gathers their two kids and assorted relatives and friends to compete in the Gumbo Gala. His stinky secret to prize-winning gumbo is the rich seafood broth he prepares in advance with discarded fish scraps from a seafood market.“Call it a progressive mindset or a sense of social justice, but when Episcopalians get an opportunity like this to help, they just do it,” said Ennis.The Wednesday Morning Sinners team from All Saints’ Episcopal Church has competed in all 14 years of the Gumbo Gala, the biggest Episcopal event in Alabama. Photo: Sara WalkerEasy to rue/ruin the rouxEarly on, St. Luke’s and St. Mary’s were the church teams to beat in the quest for the Most Divine Gumbo, which is determined by the palate of Alabama Bishop Kee Sloan and two local priests. Church of the Ascension called its team the Gumbo Filers, a nod to filé, the powdered sassafras originally used by Native Americans that gives gumbo its flavor. One of the church’s members, Nancy Sharp, lives at Episcopal Place and competes on the team.The Gumbo Filers twice have won the first-place trophy (an engraved golden stockpot) behind the leadership of professional chef John Wilson, who first tasted gumbo while apprenticing in New Orleans.“It’s so hard to describe gumbo because it’s an entity unto itself,” he said. “You have to be in the South and taste a lot of gumbo to understand. Everyone makes it their own way and it’s all wildly different. It’s so complex that you need the first few spoonfuls to try to appreciate what’s going on.”Originally from Boston, Wilson maintains that the heart and soul of any decent gumbo is the roux (pronounced “rue”), a thickener of flour and fat that originated in French cooking. At least one Gumbo Filer will keep a constant eye on the roux. “It needs to be a deep dark color, like roasted chestnuts,” Wilson said. “If you can get it to that point without burning it, you are going to have a good gumbo.”To the roux, his team will add broth, meat (this year it’s smoked duck) and locally grown vegetables diced the day before. Their competition entry is 15 to 20 gallons, some of this and some of that, making a sum that is greater than its parts. For Wilson, the multiplying effect (more fish focused, less on loaves) reflects Episcopal outreach.“Gumbo is typical of what we do and who we are: We help people in need,” Wilson said. “Cooking is what I do, so that’s what I contribute.”The Rev. Katy Smith (center) volunteers at the 2018 Gumbo Gala, the biggest Episcopal event in Alabama. Photo: Sara WalkerThese pit crews tend fires, not change tiresCompetitive cooking for charity draws well in the South, especially in the months between college football seasons. While only the churches compete for the Most Divine Gumbo prize, the Gumbo Gala has divisions for professional chefs, amateur cooks and student teams.Wilson directs the culinary arts program at nearby Wallace State Community College, which sends a team of chefs-in-training to compete in the Gumbo Gala’s student competition. So will its rival, Jefferson State Community College.“I think we have an edge on them because I’ve won this a couple of times and know what the judges are looking for,” Wilson said. “It’s about layers of flavor and how you’ve put that together. The judges are pretty experienced professionals with good palates, and they can taste those layers.”Members of the Dodd Squad Gumbo Cooking Team, representing the Dodd Law Firm, compete in the 2018 Gumbo Gala, the biggest Episcopal event in Alabama. Photo: Sara WalkerThis year, 15 churches will compete in a field of 35 to 40 teams. All Saints’ Episcopal Church will send two teams: the Young Adults and the Wednesday Morning Sinners, a team of retired men who have competed in every Gumbo Gala, a 14-year streak. A newcomer in the professional division is Bright Star, in operation since 1907 as Alabama’s oldest restaurant (its seafood gumbo sells for $4.75 a cup and $6.75 a bowl).“Despite all of the spirited debates and hoopla of which gumbo is best, one thing is for sure: this delicious comfort food that calls Southerners back home is made up of many different ingredients that all arrive from many different places, much like Episcopal Place and the church,” said Jamie Whitehurst, director of development at Episcopal Place.“Each ingredient is wonderful on its own, and when they all come together to make gumbo, something magical happens. In that regard, we are proud Episcopalians who come from many backgrounds, with many ideas and understandings of God’s word. Gumbo Gala started 14 years ago with a mission, much like Episcopal Place. Mission begins with the breath of God, and it is through helping others that we experience his boundless love.”— Michelle Hiskey is an Atlanta-based freelance writer and member of St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET By Michelle HiskeyPosted May 2, 2019 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Press Release Service Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Alabamians, Episcopalians battle it out over gumbo Cook-off raises money for Birmingham low-income, senior housing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ last_img read more


June 20, 2021 0