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Episcopal Divinity School, Union Theological Seminary agree on collaboration

first_imgEpiscopal Divinity School, Union Theological Seminary agree on collaboration Kelly Brown Douglas, scholar and racial justice activist, named EDS’s new dean Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tony Oberdorfer says: Robert B. Hunter says: Tags Theological Education Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 July 28, 2017 at 7:56 pm The sperm count of American males is declining, this matches the decline of American Christian Churches Brian MacFarland says: May 19, 2017 at 4:45 pm This is great news. As an EDS alum (MATS ’05) I was saddened by the decision to close the Cambridge campus. But this move feels just right! And to have Kelly Brown Douglas as the first dean! How fabulous. Under her leadership, EDS can continue its unique voice in the constellation of Episcopal seminaries with its decades long commitment to anti-oppression and anti-racism. Karen McLean Hessel says: May 20, 2017 at 1:09 am We already have an Episcopal seminary in New York, why the need for another? Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY May 19, 2017 at 4:21 pm I couldn’t be more excited about this partnership! In my work with Episcopal students at Union, over the years, it’s been clear that they are grounded within a justice framework deeply needed by our world. The scholarship represented by both institutions is remarkable. Kudos to all involved! Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments are closed. Rector Smithfield, NC Posted May 19, 2017 May 27, 2017 at 12:29 pm …or might this be the death knell for GTS, my alma mater? The decline of GTS over the past decade or so means it may have even more trouble drawing students in the NYC area if EDS is a viable alternative. I was involved for a time in meeting with prospective students while at GTS (2003-2006) and a common struggle they voiced was the dilemma of prospects receiving no financial support at GTS vis-a-vis a good deal of support at VTS. Reputation, ethos, etc., were issues for the prospects I spoke with, but for a number of them, practical and financial concerns were paramount. This was during a time when another one of our sister institutions had just closed, rather suddenly, and there was much concern over the viability of the seminary for the obvious reason that no one wanted to invest year or two and then be forced to leave or move. There are some serious concerns for Deans and Trustees in all of this. AMDG Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Les Singleton says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 June 4, 2017 at 11:36 am I was hugely saddened by the news that EDS would be closing. Its departure from Cambridge, and from Harvard Square, will impoverish theological discourse at Harvard, weaken student links to the Society of Saint John the Evangelist (SSJE) monastic community, and be bad for local parishes in the thriving Diocese of Massachusetts where EDS students interned. Furthermore, there is an alarming, and striking, even shocking, lack of mention of what will become of General Theological Seminary, what its relationship with Union Theological Seminary and the new, but only, in the view of many, so-called, EDS, in New York, will be, and what provision is being made for the care of future seminarians from New England. Though EDS was a “national” seminary, it had a huge impact in its relationships with Episcopal, and other, churches in New England. The silence on these matters, thus far, is huge, and terrible. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET John Rawlinson says: Rector Bath, NC May 19, 2017 at 5:55 pm total disaster. We give up Harvard, Cambridge, a wonderful campus, for a second rate troubled Union. EDS will die. alumni giving will dry up. General is already in NYC. EDS could have experimented in continuing ed, a retreat center, etc. the endowment could have kept the campus going, es. since the faculty are gone. May 20, 2017 at 10:59 pm What will happen to Jonathan Daniels? Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Cindy Savage-King says: May 20, 2017 at 9:48 am I wish a few years ago Seabury-Western had been a little more creative when they were charting their future. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Pamela G. Conrad says: Carol B. Clinton says: May 23, 2017 at 12:06 pm I do think that Kelly Brown Douglas is wonderful. With regard to “EDS” moving to NY, I must point out that since no faculty, staff, nor students are moving to Union, EDS is not moving– its endowment is moving. The Body of Christ is composed of people, not buildings. This is true for seminaries as well. I am EDS. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK [Episcopal Divinity School] Episcopal Divinity School (EDS) and Union Theological Seminary announced May 19 that they have signed an agreement that will allow EDS to continue as an Episcopal seminary through a collaboration with Union at its campus in New York City beginning in the fall of 2018.“We had three goals when we began to plan this news phase in EDS’s life,” said the Rev.  Gary Hall, chair of the EDS board. “We wanted to continue providing Episcopal theological education within an accredited, degree-granting program, deepen our historic commitment to gospel-centered justice, and provide financial strength and stability for EDS’s future. Today, I am delighted to say that we have achieved all three.”“This is an historic moment,” said the Rev. Serene Jones, president of the Union faculty and Johnston Family Professor for Religion and Democracy at Union. “We are honored that EDS has chosen to partner with us and are certain that the stewardship of our deepest commitments will be fulfilled in the years ahead.”The Rev. Kelly Brown Douglas will be the first dean of EDS at Union. Photo: Washington National CathedralEDS appointed the Rev. Kelly Brown Douglas, Susan D. Morgan Professor of Religion at Goucher College in Maryland and canon theologian at Washington National Cathedral, as the first dean of EDS at Union. Douglas will also join the Union faculty as a professor. She is the author of many articles and five books, including “Stand Your Ground:  Black Bodies and the Justice of God,” which was written in response to the murder of Trayvon Martin.“Kelly Brown Douglas is one of the most distinguished religious thinkers, teachers, ministers, and activists in the nation,” Jones said. “We are confident that Union’s longstanding commitment to both the Gospel and social justice will be strengthened and enhanced under her leadership.”Ordained as an Episcopal priest in 1983, Douglas holds a master’s degree in theology and a Ph.D. in systematic theology from Union. Her academic work focuses on womanist theology, sexuality and the black church, and she is a sought-after speaker and author on issues of racial justice and theology.“Kelly is an Episcopal Church leader and an eminent scholar—and she is a daughter of Union,” Hall said. “Working together, EDS and Union aim to advance the causes of social justice and theology in the world and Kelly is the ideal leader for this new venture.”“I am excited for the challenge,” Douglas said. “What I am really happy about for the wider EDS community is that this isn’t the typical bad news of a small seminary closing. This is the news that this place believed enough in its mission that it went out and found a way to carry that mission forward in a viable fashion, and found a way for the mission to grow. EDS is going to continue. The EDS community has found the platform to do that, and they have found in UTS an institution that shares their mission. I feel privileged to be a part of this next chapter in EDS’ life.”Beginning in 2018, students who enroll in the EDS program at Union will earn graduate degrees from Union and also fulfill requirements for ordination in the Episcopal Church. In addition to Douglas, EDS will hire a professor of Anglican studies to join the four Episcopal priests currently on Union’s faculty.“I look forward to the amazing possibilities that will be brought forth through this affiliation,” said Union’s Board Chair Wolcott B. Dunham Jr. “Our work together will surely expand the ways we serve the church and the world.” A lifelong Episcopalian, Dunham is also senior warden of St. James’ Episcopal Church in the City of New York and a former trustee of the Episcopal Diocese of New YorkEDS plans to purchase a floor in a new building being constructed at Union that will house offices, residential space for the dean, and other facilities. The EDS campus in Cambridge will be sold after operations there cease in July, and the proceeds will be added to the school’s endowment, currently valued at $53 million.The EDS board has voted to cap spending at four percent of its endowment once expenses associated with the move to Union are paid. “We are in this for the long haul,” said Bonnie Anderson, vice chair of the EDS board.  “Enshrining our commitment to sensible, sustainable spending in our affiliation agreement was important to us.”EDS alums will enjoy the same library and campus privileges accorded to Union alums. The EDS library and archives will be reviewed by representatives from both schools and Union will accept items that do not duplicate its own holdings. The Burke Library at Union, part of Columbia University’s library system and one of the largest theological libraries in North America, with holdings of more than 700,000 items.The initial term of the EDS-Union affiliation agreement is eleven years, and both schools have the option to agree to extensions beyond that time. EDS will remain its own legal entity with its own board of trustees.The two seminaries began negotiations in February after Union was chosen from among nine potential candidates that expressed interest in an alliance with EDS. The EDS board, spurred by financial challenges that were depleting the school’s endowment, voted in 2016 to cease granting degrees in May 2017 and to explore options for EDS’s future.EDS has adopted a generous severance plan for its faculty and staff. All students who did not complete their degrees this month are being “taught out” at other seminaries with EDS’s financial support so as to avoid additional costs.About Union Theological SeminaryUnion Theological Seminary in the City of New York is a seminary and a graduate school of theology established in 1836 by founders “deeply impressed by the claims of the world upon the church.” Union prepares women and men for committed lives of service to the church, academy and society. A Union education develops practices of mind and body that foster intellectual and academic excellence, social justice, and compassionate wisdom. Grounded in the Christian tradition and responsive to the needs of God’s creation, Union’s graduates make a difference wherever they serve.Union believes that a new interreligious spirituality of radical openness and love is the world’s best hope for peace, justice, and the care of God’s creation. Empowered by groundbreaking inquiry aligned with practical realism and a bias for action, Union is charting a profound new course for enduring social change. Union’s graduates stand out wherever they serve, practicing their vocations with courage and perseverance, and speaking clearly and acting boldly on behalf of social justice in all of its forms.About Episcopal Divinity SchoolEpiscopal Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts was formed in 1974 by the merger of Philadelphia Divinity School (1857) and Episcopal Theological School (1867). For more than 40 years, EDS has offered a bold and expansive vision of inclusion and social justice in the service of preparing students to lead faith communities.In July 2016, the EDS Board of Trustees voted to cease granting degrees in May 2017 and to explore options for EDS’s future that would carry on the seminary’s historic mission, continue accredited degree-granting theological education, and provide financial strength and stability for EDS’s future. More information is available here. henry idema says: Featured Events May 27, 2017 at 12:27 pm …or might this be the death knell for GTS, my alma mater? The decline of GTS over the past decade or so means it may have even more trouble drawing students in the NYC area if EDS is a viable alternative. I was involved for a time in meeting with prospective students while at GTS (2003-2006) and a common struggle they vooced was the dilemma of prospects receiving no financial support at GTS vis-a-vis a good deal of support at VTS. Reputation, ethos, etc., were issues for the prospects I spoke with, but for a number of them, practical and financial concerns were paramount. This was during a time when another one of our sister institutions had just closed, rather suddenly, and there was much concern over the viability of the seminary for the obvious reason that no one wanted to invest year or two and then be forced to leave or move. There are some serious concerns for Deans and Trustees in all of this. AMDG Rector Collierville, TN Gloria Payne -Carter says: Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Fr. Jeff Hulet says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Comments (19) James Meredith Day says: Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID May 19, 2017 at 8:30 pm I was thinking along to the same lines. With a move to NYC, why did they not explore a partnership with General. Lallie Lloyd says: May 20, 2017 at 1:14 pm Makes perfect sense for these times … one thing, please have what is left of the old PDS library placed where independent scholars can access it. The Philadelphia/Boston mix was unique and may have contributed to so much amazing work done by so many early ‘institutional’ church leaders…. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Daniel Anderson Toler says: May 27, 2017 at 11:14 am It would seem that Identity Politics is now in the ascendancy in various parts of the church and, ironically, transforming Christian ministry at the service of all persons – whether Democrat, Green, Independent, Libertarian, or Republican – into a much more narrowly conceived commitment to particular emphases – an ironic reversal of the hard-won baptismal and expansive ecclesiology of a truly catholic community. I strongly support the BCP baptismal renunciations and promises that do not narrow pastoral ministry to one or two laudable concerns. Samuel Torvend says: May 19, 2017 at 11:46 pm This is beyond sad. Makes no sense that EDS didn’t partner with General. None. And sitting on a $53 million dollar endowment why didn’t they make someone (General, Union) come to them??? I’m sure EDS’s so-called “trustees” are patting themselves on the back but they shouldn’t. They destroyed a wonderful, historical school. “EDS” (why are they even calling it that???) will never get one penny from me. May 24, 2017 at 1:37 pm I agree with the criticism. The problem is that in recent years EDS had drifted so far to the left politically (like the nearby Harvard Divinity School) that serious Episcopalians could no longer take the place seriously. This clearly accounted for many of the financial problems that finally did the school in. Susanne Watson Epting says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Fr. Jeff Hulet says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY May 20, 2017 at 7:05 pm A few short years ago there was an effort to de-centralize the Church, and move some functions outside New York, now we have a counter move– co-locating seminaries in New York. Perhaps the Union-EDS collaborative should begin to negotiate with Virginia Seminary to move to New York, and then Nashotah House, and then . . . . Since New York is a high cost area, then we could mount a huge effort to raise money to help seminarians cover the costs of living in New York. We should be delighted to have a New York base, since that will equip graduates for the many small and rural congregations in the Church. This is another decision to mark the Episcopal Church as the church of the elite. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books May 19, 2017 at 9:01 pm Great collaborative. Just what The Jesus Movement needs in raising up new leaders in The Episcopal Church for the long haul. Congratulations. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Christine Janis says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis May 19, 2017 at 5:55 pm Thrilled with this news. Kelly Brown Douglas is a great choice for this new role. I celebrate this positive outcome and fantastic future for Kelly and these important institutions. (When I was an M. Div. Student at Union I actually took a memorable joint course with EDS & UTS.) And I was honored to have been a sister student when Kelly was at Union. Her recent book, Stand Your Ground: Black Bodies and the Justice of God offers an essential theological, ethical perspective for an important conversation. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJlast_img read more


June 20, 2021 0

Institute of Fundraising seeks new trustees

first_img  20 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Institute of Fundraising seeks new trustees AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 4 April 2005 | News This year the Institute is specifically encouraging candidates from England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland to stand to ensure full representation nationwide. “We will present a stronger collective voice by being able to speak as either one nation or a UK wide body when it is most appropriate”, Sue Douthwaite, Honorary Secretary, told the Institute’s members. This year is the first year when one seat is specifically earmarked for candidates from Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales as well as three representing England. When the ballot papers are published, it will be clear which candidates are standing for which nations. The Institute of Fundraising is now seeking candidates willing to stand as potential trustees, and hopes in future that its trustees will together represent all of the four nations of the UK.The Institute of Fundraising has invited its members to consider standing as trustees of the organisation. Completed nomination forms from those passionate about fundraising need to be returned by 13 May 2005.Trustees need to be available to attend six meetings a year as well as participate in one of the sub-committees dealing with one of the Institute’s areas of strategic work. Meetings are normally held in London and usually last from 3 to 6pm. The term of office is three years with the ability to re-stand for a further three years. The Institutes’ governing documents forbid Trustees to be paid other than reimbursement of standard expenses. Advertisementlast_img read more


June 16, 2021 0

Williams lands on Nuggets’ Summer League roster

first_imgBenton McDonald is a senior journalism and political science double major from Austin, Texas. He has worked for TCU360 since his freshman year and is currently the executive editor. Facebook Linkedin ReddIt Benton McDonaldhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/benton-mcdonald/ Facebook TCU baseball finds their biggest fan just by saying hello + posts Courtesy: GoFrogs.com Twitter Previous articleThe Skiff: Orientation EditionNext articleBrodziansky joins Williams in Summer League, added to Cavaliers roster Benton McDonald RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Another series win lands TCU Baseball in the top 5, earns Sikes conference award Thousands of TCU community members receive COVID-19 vaccines as university supply increases TCU rowing program strengthens after facing COVID-19 setbacks Benton McDonaldhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/benton-mcdonald/ Chancellor talks stimulus money, COVID-19 vaccines and more at limited attendance faculty town hall Linkedin Benton McDonaldhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/benton-mcdonald/ Board approves tuition freeze, RRI actions but doesn’t act on eligibility issue spurred by Williams Benton McDonald Benton McDonaldhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/benton-mcdonald/ printFormer Horned Frog basketball player Kenrich Williams officially joined the Denver Nuggets’ Las Vegas Summer League roster Monday.The NBA Summer League is hosted in Las Vegas and Salt Lake City and is a chance for NBA teams to develop their newly drafted players, while also giving undrafted players like Williams, a chance to make the teams’ official roster for the regular season.Williams went undrafted in last week’s NBA draft despite being a projected second round pick by The Ringer, Sports Illustrated, and Bleacher Report. He was the 64th ranked player on ESPN’s pre-draft rankings. The 6’8” power forward was knocked down draft boards for his age, 23, and his lack of one specific elite skill.However, he has a knack for rebounding and the versatility to guard multiple positions on the defensive end, something that is critical to sticking around in the NBA. ESPN ranked him as the eighth best undrafted free agent available.Williams was named second team All-Big 12 his senior season after averaging 13.2 points and 9.3 rebounds per game.Williams and the Nuggets begin their games July 6 at UNLV  in Las Vegas, Nevada. Settlement reached between TCU, former professor in discrimination lawsuit ReddIt Twitterlast_img read more


June 13, 2021 0

Brown eggs are order of day on Henderson farm

first_img Published 7:31 pm Friday, July 9, 2010 She liked the idea of having a few live chicks on the farm so she agreed to relieve the Montgomery couple of the chickens they could catch and deliver.Eight chickens found a new home at the coop that the Hendersons had built especially for them in a bright, sunny spot not too far from the house.“It’s not the usual chicken coop but the chickens seem to like it,” Henderson said, laughing.The coop was built for comfort and for safety. The nests are red plastic tubs that have been tailored for laying comfort and the ladder is not the usual rickety rungs that chickens have to traverse. It’s a real stepladder that’s easy on the legs and feet. Latest Stories Email the author Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthBet You’re Pretty Curious About Jaden’s Net Worth Right About Now, HuhBradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Brown eggs are order of day on Henderson farm Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration “I was online with a cattleman in Montgomery and, in some of our discussions, he mentioned that he had chickens that he would like to get rid of, if he could catch them,” Henderson said. “His wife had mail ordered biddies and the company sent double what she had ordered. It would have cost the company more to have the biddies shipped back to them than they were worth so his wife was told to just keep the biddies.”Naturally, biddies grow up to be chickens and there were more chickens at home on the range than the couple wanted.Decorative items with chicken motifs are popular in households in urban areas as well as rural areas so the market is flooded with them. Having grown up on a farm, Henderson has always loved farm animals and her home has its share of decorative times with chickens and roosters. Book Nook to reopen Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits You Might Like Ellis Bush takes pride in ‘county’ farm When Ellis and Becky Bush tired of the corporate world, they left Pennsylvania for the red clay fields of home…. read more The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Ask Kellie Henderson which came first, the chicken or the egg and she’ll say without hesitation, “The chicken.”Nothing could be closer to the truth, for at Henderson’s backyard chicken farm near Shellhorn, the chickens did come first.Henderson got her flock as an after thought. She admits that she is first and foremost a cow-girl at heart. She and her husband, Richard, own part-interest in a herd of 126 head of beef cattle and she takes pride in that ownership. She also makes it her mission to know as much about cows and the beef market as she can. So, that’s how it was that she came away from the cow message board as the owner of a flock of chickens. Sponsored Content By The Penny Hoarder By Jaine Treadwell Skip Print Article The safety of the chickens was a major concern for Henderson and her flock.“We have no shortage of hawks out here and we have owls, too,” she said. “We covered the top of the coop with wire to keep out them out. And, I read that raccoons will team up to kill chickens. When a chicken is frightened, it will run to the corner of the pen. The raccoons will spread out to all corners and reach in and the chicken won’t have any chance of getting away. So, we put a string of hot wire around the bottom of the pen. It keeps dogs away, too.”The Hendersons’ own dogs quickly realized that the chickens rule the roost so they leave the chickens to their coop and are content to control the yard.Henderson is not sure exactly what breed her chickens are.“I just call them a mixed breed,” she said. “All I know is that they are brown egg layers. Some chickens lay white eggs, others lay brown eggs.”The schools of thought are that the color of the eggs is determined by the breed, the skin pigment or the food the chickens eat.Henderson said she has been told that the color of a chicken’s ear lobe will tell what color its eggs will be.“But I don’t know where a chicken’s ear lobe is,” she said, laughing. “All I know is that my chickens are brown egg layers. Some people say that brown eggs taste different – better – than white eggs but I don’t think that’s true.”Henderson said it is true that “yard” eggs have a brighter, richer yoke.“Chickens that eat grass and other vegetation lay eggs that have a richer color,” she said. “That rich color comes from the beta carotene that is found in the vegetation. But, whether, that improves the taste of the eggs … I don’t think so.”However, Henderson said that freshness does made a difference in the taste.“An egg, fresh from the farm, seems to have a better taste,” she said. “But, because of the readily available local supply of eggs, delivery is made to grocery stores in a day or two so most eggs are somewhat farm fresh.”Henderson’s eggs aren’t grocery store bound. All of her eggs are free for the asking and she has a long line of family and friends “asking.”“Chickens lay an egg about every 26 hours during their prime laying time, which is about a year or more,” Henderson said. “I lost one of the chickens so I get seven eggs a day. Most people don’t know much about chickens and eggs and I’ve had a lot to learn myself. But the question that I’m asked most often is how do chickens lay eggs without a rooster. They are surprised when I tell them that you don’t have to have a rooster for chickens to lay eggs.”However, a chicken farmer does have to have a rooster to have biddies and Henderson does not want a rooster.“I might take a few more chickens if my friends can catch more of theirs but I do not want a rooster,” Henderson said, laughing. “And, I don’t want to have to worry about a setting hen.”However, one of Henderson’s girls has shown an inclination to set.“You don’t want your hens to set because they won’t lay as long as they are setting,” she said. “I’ve heard stories about farmers who train their hens to set by putting a porcelain door knob in the nest. The hen thinks it’s an egg.”Another story that Henderson likes to share is about a farmer who put golf balls in a hen’s nest.“One night, he slipped some baby chicks under her,” Henderson said with a smile. “The next morning, she saw the biddies and thought she had hatched the golf balls.”Since Henderson is not into raising chickens, she is content with her seven girls and encourages them to lay as often as possible in order to keep her family and friends supplied with farm fresh brown eggs.“Right now, they have slowed production because the weather is so hot,” Henderson said.“Chickens won’t lay at night so the longer the days, the more time they have to lay. I’ve read that some farmers put artificial lights in their hen houses to give them more laying time but I don’t have any plans to do that.”And neither does she have any plans to pipe music into the chicken coop in hopes of encouraging increased production. Her girls are on their own.At night, when the chickens are on the roost and the dogs have settled down, Kellie Henderson goes to sleep listening to the nighttime serenade of Mother Nature and knowing that all is well and good in the hen house.last_img read more


May 24, 2021 0

GSL Signs Contract for Construction of Six OPVs for Indian Coast Guard

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today GSL Signs Contract for Construction of Six OPVs for Indian Coast Guard View post tag: GSL View post tag: Six View post tag: construction Goa Shipyard Ltd. (GSL) signed a contract for the construction of six Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPVs) for the Indian Coast Guard on 9th May 2012. The vessels are based on in- house design of Goa Shipyard Ltd, which has considerable expertise in designing and constructing a range of Patrol Vessels for the Indian Defence Forces.GSL expects to cut steel for the first of the vessels within fifteen days.These vessels when commissioned will be the most advanced Patrol Vessels in service with the Indian Coast Guard. Overall length of the vessels is 105 metres with a displacement of about 2400 tonnes. As compared to the earlier built Patrol Vessels, these six Offshore Patrol Vessels will be fitted with a contemporary Navigational Integrated Bridge System with Bridge Watch Navigational Call Up System, CCTV System for complete surveillance, additional features like quick response boats for rescue and anti piracy, four lane simulator for small arms training and many more advanced features. The hull would be the most efficient form designed by GSL and would provide for fuel efficiency, crew comfort and excellent sea keeping qualities.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, May 14, 2012 View post tag: News by topic Industry news View post tag: Naval View post tag: OPVs View post tag: Guardcenter_img View post tag: contract View post tag: coast View post tag: Navy View post tag: Indian GSL Signs Contract for Construction of Six OPVs for Indian Coast Guard View post tag: Signs May 14, 2012 Share this articlelast_img read more


May 4, 2021 0

Faculty Mechanical Engineering

first_imgPhysical Requirements Minimum Knowledge & Skills Minimum Salary RangeTBD Posting Close Date None The Science Department is seeking an Engineering faculty member whowill be responsible for developing curricula and coursework for ourEngineering Associate Degree programs and providing instructionwithin the Engineering and allied programs as qualified. Inaddition to providing quality instruction, the faculty member willbe responsible for providing scheduled office hours for studentconsultation, serve on College committees as needed and assigned,and participating in student orientated instructional andadvisement activities as needed and assigned. Position TypeFaculty Maximum Salary Range Positions in this class typically require: reaching, standing,fingering, grasping, talking, hearing, and seeing. Sedentary Work:Exerting up to 10 pounds of force occasionally and/or a negligibleamount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pullor otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary workinvolves sitting most of the time. Jobs are sedentary if walkingand standing are required only occasionally and all other sedentarycriteria are met. Minimum Education/Training/Experience Master’s degree and 18 graduate hours of coursework in Engineeringor related area; two years of teaching and/or curriculumdevelopment experience at the post-secondary level. Special Instructions to Applicant Contract Length9 months Position TitleFaculty Mechanical Engineering * Do you have a Master’s Degree and at least 18 credit hours inthe discipline?YesNo * Please describe in detail how your background and experiencewould be applicable for this position in a College/Universitysetting.(Open Ended Question)* Please describe the attributes that will make you a strongcandidate for this position.(Open Ended Question) Demonstrable history of Engineering course and curriculadevelopment and instruction; experience teaching in a 2-yearcollege environment. Job Duties Prepare, develop, revise curriculum and course work.Meet classes as scheduled.Complete paperwork/tests and issue student grades asscheduled.Maintain office hours for student consultation.This position will report to the Science Department Chair and isresponsible for performing tasks and assignments given by thedepartment chair and/or dean. Serve on committees as needed andassigned.Other duties as appropriate to the position. Documents Needed to ApplyRequired DocumentsResumeCover LetterTranscripts (1 of 3)Optional DocumentsLetter of RecommendationCurriculum VitaeAdditional Transcripts (2 of 3)Additional Transcripts (3 of 3) College of the Mainland is an affirmative action/equal opportunityinstitution and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color,sex, age, national origin, religion, disability or veteranstatus.College of the Mainland does not discriminate on the basis ofdisability in the recruitment and admission of students, therecruitment and employment of faculty and staff, and the operationof its programs and activities, as specified by federal laws andregulations within Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and 1992. Candidates that are eligible applyInternal/External FLSAExempt EEO Statement Open Until FilledYes Please NOTE : All applications must contain complete job histories,which include job title, dates of employment (month/year), name ofemployer, supervisors name and phone numbers and a description ofduties performed. If this information is not submitted, yourapplication may be considered incomplete. Applications with “Seeattached” or “See resume” will not be accepted in lieu of acomplete application. Omission of data can be the basis fordisqualification; you may state “unknown” for any incompletefields. A scanned copy of unofficial transcript(s) must be attachedto the online application. Preferred Education/Training/Experience Licensing/Certification Requirements Mid Point Salary RangeTBD Posting NumberF135P Preferred Knowledge & Skills Ability to develop Engineering courses and curricula andeffectively teach engineering courses. Posting Open Date11/11/2020 Class Summary Position FundingRegular Supplemental QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*). Position Details Employment StatusFull Time Quick Link for Direct Access to Postinghttps://jobs.com.edu/postings/2343 Master’s or Doctorate degree in Mechanical Engineering or relatedarea. Teaching experience in Engineering courses at a community ortwo-year college. * What is your Philosophy for serving students?(Open Ended Question)* Do you have experience working in a community college?yesnolast_img read more


May 3, 2021 0

New Ninth Street Crosswalk Signal to Go Live on June 11

first_imgA new user-activated traffic signal on Ninth Street near the Haven Avenue intersection will be operational on June 11.The signal and a new crosswalk are designed to help bicyclists and pedestrians cross the busy gateway.A High-Intensity Activated Crosswalk (HAWK) signal that will be activated only by a push button and will be timed to work only in coordination with the existing traffic light at Ninth Street and West Avenue.The Ocean City Police Department will make an educational presentation in the week before the signal goes live, but the department forwarded a link to a YouTube video (above) that explains how the HAWK signal works.The signal is at the intersection of Aldrich Avenue (near the TD Bank and the Haven Avenue intersection), and it will help provide an easier crossing for bicycles traveling north-south along a safe bicycle corridor under development.City Council awarded a $238,857 contract to Diehl Electric Company of Hammonton in March to complete the work, and the city used a $100,000 state Department of Transportation Safe Street to Transit Program grant for the job.__________Sign up for OCNJ Daily’s free newsletter“Like” us on Facebook A new pedestrian and bicycle crossing of Ninth Street at Aldrich Avenue is near complete.last_img read more


May 2, 2021 0

Donations of Gloves and Masks Sought in Cape May County

first_imgCape May County’s government is seeking the public’s help in gathering necessary medical supplies for those at the frontline of the COVID-19 outbreak. The Cape May County Health Department and the Cape May County Office of Emergency Management are seeking donations of sealed boxes of gloves, masks and personal protective equipment from businesses that are closed during the pandemic. Businesses, salons, schools and others may have access to some of these materials that could be vital to medical personnel as time goes forward, according to a county press release.The request is that these donations would be brought to Cape May County OEM, but people should call ahead before making the donation at 609-600-5055.“I have seen our community step up time after time over the years in Cape May County,” said Freeholder Jeff Pierson, liaison to the Health Department. He continued, “If anyone has these gloves, masks, or PPE, we ask them to donate these materials for the doctors, nurses and all first responders on the frontlines.”The need for this equipment is well-known across the United States. It is expected that the need for these medical supplies will increase as testing becomes more available and more positive tests come from residents of Cape May County. “Our OEM and Health Department are working with the state and local medical professionals to ensure that all of the necessary medical supplies are made available,” said Freeholder Director Gerald M. Thornton, liaison to the county’s OEM. Thornton added, “This is an issue across the entire country and any way our local businesses can reduce our need for these medical supplies would be very much appreciated.” Thornton and Pierson are urging Cape May County residents to stay safe and follow current health recommendations to stem the spread of the coronavirus.last_img read more


May 2, 2021 0

Documenting health needs in African communities destabilized by militia violence

first_imgThe militant group the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) has waged a 25-year campaign of fear in Uganda which has since spread to neighboring Sudan, Central African Republic, and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), killing and mutilating tens of thousands of people, looting communities, and abducting children for forced conscription. Last fall, U.S. President Barack Obama shone an international spotlight on the group’s horrific practices when he announced that he was sending 100 U.S. troops to advise countries battling the LRA and hunting for the its fugitive leader Joseph Kony.The Harvard Humanitarian Initiative (HHI) is working to document the destabilizing effect that the LRA has had on the region. Jocelyn Kelly, MS ’08, director of HHI’s Women in War program, traveled to northern DRC in January with documentarian Lindsay Branham, program director for Discover the Journey (DTJ), a co-collaborator on the project. They conducted an assessment of the needs of communities as they recover from violence and also struggle to reintegrate children who escaped from the LRA. A report detailing their findings will be released in March. Read Full Storylast_img read more


March 1, 2021 0

Coronavirus Research

first_imgBack in January when she heard COVID-19 had been identified, Malak Esseili stopped taking her children along on trips to the grocery store. She also called her sisters and told them to begin wearing infinity scarfs they could easily use as makeshift masks while in public.As an assistant professor of food virology at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Esseili has been focused on studying the microbial ecology of human viral pathogens (such as human noroviruses), and now her work includes the emerging viral pathogen SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19).Esseili came to UGA in March 2019 after eight years with the Food Animal Health Research Program at The Ohio State University (OSU) where she studied with Qiuhong Wang and OSU Distinguished Research Professor Linda Saif, who has conducted research on coronaviruses and other zoonotic viruses for decades.While COVID-19 is a new — or novel — virus, coronaviruses are not new. Named for the crown-like spikes on their surface, human coronaviruses were first identified in the late 1960s. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there are seven coronaviruses that can infect humans. They include Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), severe acute respiratory syndrome-CoV and the new SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19.There are also coronaviruses that affect animals, including bovines, poultry, cats, dogs and other animals.“Before 2002, animal coronaviruses were a big concern for veterinarians,” Esseili said. “One hit the swine industry in 2013 and caused high mortality in piglets.”While she was at OSU, Esseili worked with a team trying to develop a vaccine for the 2013 swine coronavirus.Coronaviruses are all shaped the same, she said, but they can behave differently within a particular host and in terms of environmental stability and inactivation.“These viruses are not wimpy and can survive for days to weeks in the environment, depending on the particular viral strain, temperature, humidity and what they land on,” she said. “Fortunately, they are susceptible to certain disinfectants, such as 70% ethanol and bleach, when used as instructed on the label.”As someone who works very closely with viruses in her research program, Esseili urges the public to take the current pandemic situation seriously.“This is a new virus. We don’t have preexisting immunity to it, and we don’t know the minimum infectious dose,” she said. “What is more problematic than the other severe human coronaviruses (SARS) is that people can be infectious (with COVID-19) before symptoms appear or while symptoms are mild, as the virus was recently shown to replicate also in the throat. This means the infectious virus can easily transmit between people when coughing, sneezing or just talking,” she said.  Esseili urges people to be vigilant and continue to check current guidelines from the CDC.“As our knowledge of the virus evolves, these guidelines may evolve,” she said.COVID-19 has caused significant impacts on people’s health and on the economy including the food industry, which has witnessed closures due to COVID-19 illnesses in food workers. Esseili’s research at UGA is focused on researching effective control approaches and addressing critical questions to help the industry fight this disease.Esseili presented an overview of coronaviruses during the UGA Center for Food Safety’s annual meeting held early in March and co-led a question-and-answer session alongside CDC experts to address COVID-19 questions from the industry. “These industries are not only vital to the local economy in Georgia, but they also contribute to food security, which is crucial to maintain a healthy population,” she said.For more information on the UGA Center for Food Safety, go to cfs.caes.uga.edu.last_img read more


January 17, 2021 0